home banner

Seller’s Blog

Carl Wright of R1 Appraisal: Where are St. George Home Prices Going? (St. George Real Estate Radio Show)

If you prefer to view and comment on Facebook vs. the YouTube video above, click here: Facebook Live.

Below is the actual St. George Real Estate Morning Drive show, hosted by St. George Real Estate Agent Jeremy Larkin, word for word! Enjoy and please share if you find it valuable! 

Jeremy Larkin and The Larkin Group @ Keller Williams Realty can be reached by calling 435-767-9821, or emailing sales@gostgeorge.com. 

Andy: These guys have maybe the coolest theme music out there.
Jeremy: Yes, we do.
Andy: St. George Real Estate show with Jeremy Larkin. Jeremy joined today Carl Wright. Guys, I love talking about real estate. I am always kind of in the market for a different house even though I have been in my current house seven years. Maybe you can help me out a little bit.
Jeremy: Listen, I have got some stuff in the $2-3 million range I think you should look at.
Andy: Okay, can I borrow a couple of mill?
Jeremy: Yeah.
Andy: Okay.
Jeremy: Here is the deal. I would happily contribute to your down payment. I cannot say what, but hey, by the way –
Andy: A couple of cows or –
Jeremy: — welcome. Welcome to the show, Andy.
Andy: Thank you, Jeremy. It is great to be here. I have been looking forward to this day for about a week. I have been here what, three times now, sitting and listening to you guys –
Jeremy: Yeah, yeah, this is –
Andy: — but Mike would never let me talk.
Jeremy: No he would not. He would not.
Andy: Now, I get to talk.
Jeremy: Last week was the famed, final, final, the farewell show. Mike is no longer with us. Is that how you say it?
Carl: That is sad.
Andy: Well, I will say this. I called a basketball game with him last night, so I know he is still with us, he is just not with us.
Jeremy: He is with us. Which game did you guys call?
Andy: Pineview Dixie. Three-pointer at the buzzer in overtime. It was a great game.
Jeremy: Wait a minute. Who won?
Andy: Pineview won it.
Jeremy: Oh man.
Carl: Oh wow.
Jeremy: See I was not, literally I was so focused in other things I did not even know they were playing last night, which is sad because I am a Dixie High graduate. And that used to be, that was the rivalry. But the rivalries now, there is a variety of rivalries. It used to be Pineview and, excuse me, it used to be Cedar-Dixie, which was –
Andy: Right.
Jeremy: — when I was young. And then it became Pineview-Dixie. And now there is, there is kind of a variety of rivalries. Isn’t there, Carl? What do you think? What do you think the real rivalry is now?
Carl: Gosh, it is, I think there is a rivalry between everybody now.
Jeremy: Your kids, your kids will go where? Crimson or Desert Hills?
Carl: We will go to the new Crimson.
Jeremy: You will go to Crimson.
Andy: Brand-new school in the fall.
Carl: Brand-new school.
Jeremy: Yeah, so it is has changed. The dynamic has changed. Three-pointer at the buzzer. Good grief. I think I just had a traumatic episode thinking about Jordan and him, the fallaway three-pointer on the Jazz in the 1996 –
Andy: Oh, flashback.
Carl: Thanks for bringing that up.
Andy: Yeah, thanks a lot.
Jeremy: Yeah, we are never going to live that down because genuinely speaking the Jazz are never, ever going to probably have that chance again. I am sorry, guys. It is what it is. It is hard to attract, hey welcome to St. George Real Estate sports show. It is hard to attract, I have said this forever. Now, I am going to beat up on my own state. I was born and raised in St. George, Utah. My father was born and raised in St. George, Utah. So we love, we love this state. We love this city. We love, but it is very hard to attract talent to Utah. Right?
Carl: Agreed.
Jeremy: Because the big stars are not super interested in, and can we just call it what it is, our liquor laws. Our lack of nightlife. Very much like state religious kind of predominance. They are just not interested. And that is the same for BYU and University of Utah. University of Utah has done pretty well, but at the end of the day, I love my state, but it is just hard, right, to attract talent.
Carl: True, but I have to say that Donovan Mitchell has totally –
Jeremy: Yes.
Carl: — revitalized the sports enthusiasm —
Jeremy: Yes.
Carl: Can I say that?
Jeremy: Yes.
Carl: — for the Utah Jazz. I love Donovan Mitchell. I love what he is all about. His on and off the court. He is a great, great face for the Utah Jazz.
Jeremy: Yeah, and they have come along.
Andy: To illustrate your point a little bit, Rudy Gobert should be an all-star right now. He did not get it, and I think, more than anything, is because he plays in Utah and not in New York City or LA or –
Jeremy: Bingo.
Andy: — somewhere else. And that is another reason why the great talent is not going to sign –
Jeremy: Not. It is, it is frustrating.
Andy: Yeah.
Jeremy: That is okay. That is okay. Here we are. We are here. We are live. St. George Real Estate Morning Drive. I am Jeremy Larkin, the host of the program. I have got, by the way, if you look on Facebook it says the insanely handsome Carl Wright. By the way, the insanely handsome Carl Wright joins us to share some trends that are not being told or shared, I should have said shared, by any other real estate professionals in town. And the reason I say this, it is not that it is going to be that controversial, but it is what we have been talking about, and there is this kind of, remember when you were a kid and you plugged your ears and said I am not listening, I am not listening –
Carl: Right.
Jeremy: — to your brother, sister, sibling, cousin. There is a lot of that going on right now in Washington County. A lot of I am not listening, I am not listening, I am not listening. Gang, we are inviting you this morning to actually save yourself a whole bunch of pain in 2019 by listening to what we have to say in this program. And the question that might come up, are they going to tell us that the market is crashing? No.
Andy: No.
Jeremy: No, but, but, right, Carl? But there is information that people need to know if they want to make a good decision this year.
Carl: Totally.
Jeremy: We are happy to be here. I am happy to have Carl here. Happy to have Andy Griffin here, who is not the new Mike McGary. He is Andy Griffin, and he is going to be fantastic. You moved here from where?
Andy: I have been in Southern Utah for 25 years. I grew up in Texas. In high school, my parents, much to my chagrin, moved to Salt Lake County and I told them flat out I am not going. I am staying here. I am going to stay with my friends. But when you are 14, 15 years old, you really do not get that choice.
Jeremy: Yeah.
Andy: So they actually sent me off to a camp and moved while I was gone.
Jeremy: Nice.
Andy: I no longer had a home.
Jeremy: You were strong when you said you were not going even though you were going.
Andy: Yeah.
Jeremy: Yeah.
Andy: Exactly. And then, I have been kicking around Utah. Spent one year, way northern Idaho, Moscow, Idaho on a (indiscernible) there. The thing I did not like about Idaho is the thing I love about here. The clouds rolled in October and did not leave until March. It was gloomy. It is cold out there, guys, but it is a glorious, sun shiny day. I love it.
Jeremy: It is. I am a big mountain biker. And I would happily go out this afternoon, get a beautiful ride in, put an extra layer one. It is going to be high 40s. That is a cold day, but not a big deal. Right? By the way, Bryant Head Ski Resort, I have, just so everyone knows how I operate. The Bryant Head webcam is typically pulled up on, there you go, Carl. On my computer.
Andy: Oh wow.
Jeremy: It is just always up. Bryant Head, check this out. So I was up there over the weekend. They had 10 inches Saturday night, and I thought well, that was nice. They have had 35 inches since then. So 45 inches, almost four feet. Eagle Point Ski Resort is at 31 inches. Storm total. So if you are wanting to get up there and get some skiing in –
Carl: It is a good time.
Jeremy: — or snowboarding, I have got to say –
Carl: That is the wonderful thing about St. George is that you can enjoy —
Jeremy: Right. That is why –
Carl: — you can enjoy the sunshine and not having to shovel your walks, but 45 minutes you can be on the slopes.
Jeremy: Yeah, gang, I have absolutely biked and skied in the same day in St. George.
Andy: Nice.
Jeremy: Many times.
Andy: Nice.
Jeremy: So you can do that, and that is kind of why I segued that. I thought how fun is this that Bryant Head, by the way, an hour and twenty up, typically I am an hour and twenty up and an hour and fifteen down. It is always just a little quicker coming down. That is pretty static. I am an 85 guy on the freeway, cruise control, and it is an hour and twenty minutes to that resort, and I am talking on a stormy day it is an hour twenty. It is just kind of an hour twenty to go up there. So check that out if you are looking for some fun this weekend, but welcome, Andy. Where do you live now, by the way?
Andy: I live in Washington City.
Jeremy: Washington City.
Andy: Yep, a new subdivision. Hobble Creek subdivision, and I have a beautiful home and really enjoy it. My only complaint is where our backyard backs up to 300 East there in Washington, so we are kind of looking to get something that is a little more secluded, a little off the busy road.
Jeremy: You know exactly what he is talking about.
Carl: I do.
Jeremy: Yeah. I know people who can help you. But –
Andy: I know you do.
Jeremy: — do that when you are ready to do that.
Andy: Yep.
Jeremy: Carl Wright. Welcome aboard.
Carl: Thank you for having me.
Jeremy: Yeah, I am happy to have you. We are going to have, so this is fun. We are going to have Carl today, and then we are going to have Carl and his entire team at my office at noon. His team, our team. Carl is with R1 Appraisals here in town. By the way, I need to have you guys go measure a home in New Harmony. That is after show, but –
Carl: Right.
Jeremy: — just so you know.
Carl: Love to do it.
Jeremy: We are listing an incredible, oh my goodness, incredible home in New Harmony. We will be placing this home on the market hopefully in the next week, and amazing views. Almost 5,000 square feet. Pretty cool home. So it has an entire detached guest house –
Carl: Wow.
Jeremy: — and when I went in it, it is like country home, like going into my home I grew up in with my mother. It is interesting, Carl, this is probably a great way to start this off, is they had the home on the market for six months with another agent, and they are very frustrated. Right? With an agent from Cedar City. So if you are in New Harmony, I want you to think through this. They listed the home with a guy from Cedar City because it was geographically closer by the mileage. But the issue is New Harmony is not in Iron County. It is in?
Carl: Washington.
Andy: Washington.
Jeremy: Bingo. So what they did is they hired somebody on the Iron County MLS to sell a home that is actually in Washington County. Now I am sure the home was on both Multiple Listing Services. And when we list your property and sell a property, we are always on Washington, Iron, and Wasatch MLS. We kind of go for the trifecta. But they were frustrated and then as we dug into this, it looked like everything was fine, and at a glance. So we do what is called a home marketing audit. And by the way, if you are selling a home right now, very quick plug, but it is not selling. That is the key is if your home is on the market and it is not selling and you are frustrated, I invite you to visit, this is kind of fun, we have a page that we have never talked about. It is called Why My Home Won’t Sell dot com. Literally. Why My Home Won’t Sell dot com. Go in there and plug in your critical information. This is not a solicitation of your listing. It is what called a home marketing audit. Maybe you are someone whose home just came off of the market, and it did not sell. Right? Let us know, and what we do is we just do an audit. And the audit is we look at three factors, which are marketing, condition, and pricing. And then, Carl, you know because you are a professional appraiser, that underneath those three, that canopy of three are probably another fifteen items. Right? So either marketing, the story that was told about your home was not compelling enough or it was not told to enough people. The condition, either the condition, the staging, or the location or all three were such that it was not compelling to a buyer. And or, and maybe all three factors were present, or the price of your home was such that either just buyers said sorry, there is something better for us at that price. Or maybe it was bracketed in a way that they did not, they did not see it. But we did this audit, and what do you think we found when we started looking through the square footage? The main floor was wrong. The basement was wrong. The upstairs was wrong. It was not reflective of a guest house. There is an entire detached guest house that is completely legal on the property that is about $150,000 to build that was not advertised.
Carl: Not presented. Yeah.
Jeremy: So it looked like everything was fine at a glance. I said, man, I do not know why this home has not sold. Then when we dug into it, so how often do you see data, Carl, as a professional appraiser that is just not accurate?
Carl: Oftentimes. Our job as an appraiser is to sift through all of the information that is out there and try to come up with a realistic value. We are looking at everything from marketing time. We are looking at the square footage. That is why we do not ever rely on what the county says or the, as far as square footage, bedroom, bathroom count. That is why we go in and we assess the property. We measure the property so we know what your square footage is. We will come up with your bedroom bathroom count. We look at your condition, the quality. We look at from your roof to your foundation and everything in between to determine how the market reacts to what components you have in your home, and then we come up with a value.
Jeremy: Okay, so this is kind of a fun question. Real estate agents, typically when they go to put a home on the market, they pull the square footage from where?
Carl: They usually use the county.
Jeremy: Correct. They just go to the tax records, and they go well, it says it is 4100 feet. How many appraisals have you done in your life, because you go out and you laser measure, you digitally measure where the square footage you actually measured in real life matched the county?
Carl: Hardly ever. It is usually —
Jeremy: Like 5%?
Carl: — maybe, I would say less than 5%. We are usually a little bit smaller –
Jeremy: Crazy, right?
Carl: — a little bit bigger than what the county says, which is, we use the outside measurements. You use ANSI standard of measurement, which means we measure from the outside corner to the outside corner. So we are usually a little bit bigger than what the county says, which is beneficial to people who are selling their home because then you get the actual square footage of what an appraiser is going to be using as their measurement, and then you can market your home at a slightly larger –
Jeremy: Right.
Carl: — so it behooves you a little bit to get an appraisal or have somebody come measure your home to determine what your actual square footage is.
Jeremy: Well, and Robert MacFarlane commented, good morning, Robert, it was missing almost 900 square feet.
Carl: Wow.
Jeremy: And it was 6 months on the market.
Carl: That is –
Jeremy: Ooops.
Carl: Let’s just say $100 a foot, right? That is $90,000 that they misrepresented in that.
Jeremy: Yeah, so this is kind of crazy. We are doing something we have not done in a while. We are taking this property on that was listed by another agent, and they came to us after it was no longer on the market. We are raising the price.
Carl: Wow.
Jeremy: And we do not do this very often, but we are actually going to, we believe that we can sell this home for more money than they were asking previously.
Carl: Wow. And that goes against the trend I am seeing right now, Jeremy.
Jeremy: Yep.
Carl: As I have looked at the market and looked at trends, we look at, as appraisers, we look heavily at absorption rates and months of housing supply and things like that. Something very interesting that I am seeing right now is 2018, there was a perfect storm. There were, interest rates were good. It was like the jet was taking off the runway –
Jeremy: Oh yeah.
Carl: — and we built speed all the way until September about, and I was talking to my business partner, Nick –
Jeremy: This is exactly what I noticed.
Carl: — and this is exactly how Nick put it is that the jet took off in September and started to level off in September of 2018, and now we are gliding.
Jeremy: Yep.
Carl: We are in a gliding mode right now, and we are in a transitional from being a seller’s market to a buyer’s market. We are seeing more months, more time on market. We are going from about a two-month inventory of homes to a three-and-a-half-month inventory of homes in the greater St. George area.
Jeremy: So let me throw a perspective in here. And when Carl talks about months of supply, right, or absorption rates, what he is saying is well, two months’ supply is really simple. It is how long, there was enough housing that if no one else listed a property, now I want, this is really important, if no one else put their home on the market, it would have taken two months to sell them all. Correct?
Carl: Correct.
Jeremy: The simplest way to look at it?
Carl: Correct.
Jeremy: Well now he is saying well now, we are at three-and-a-half. This is what throws people off. Three-and-a-half-months’ supply is still really strong market. It is a really strong market. But the issue is we are talking about the inventory going from two to three and a half. Right? Three and a half does not sound like a lot, but an increase from two months to three and a half months is a gigantic increase.
Carl: It is a big increase.
Jeremy: Make sense, you guys?
Andy: Yeah.
Jeremy: It is not like three and a half is a big supply. It is going from two to three and a half is a massive jump.
Carl: Yeah, and I found some more statistics. I was looking at the Washington Fields area, this is right where you live, Craig. In the Washington Fields area, I was looking at homes –
Jeremy: Or Andy.
Carl: Andy. Sorry.
Jeremy: Craig just walked out.
Carl: That is right. I am sorry, Andy. I apologize.
Andy: That is okay. No worries.
Jeremy: Craig is on his way back to Parowan to play in the snow.
Carl: Washington Fields, 2000 to 2500 square feet, the months of housing supply 12 months ago was 3.26. Right now, currently, there are 6.25 months of supply in Washington Fields between 2000 and 2500 square feet.
Jeremy: But I thought Washington Fields was one of the best markets in town?
Carl: It is one of the best markets in town, but that means everybody is trying to sell their home, and so if you are going to be competitive, if you have got your home listed right now, you really need to analyze do I really want to sell my home. If I really want to sell my home, then I probably should reduce the price by, I would say, by 5%.
Jeremy: Bingo, brother. What did I say to you on the phone when we chatted?
Carl: Yep.
Jeremy: 5%. Let me share something with folks here. Carl, I have got the Multiple Listing Service pulled up. Since January 1st, have you looked at how many properties I have listed, by the way? Washington County. And of course, I should say Washington County. This includes Iron County because it is on our Multiple Listing Service. So bear with me for a second. I am going to come in here to location and I am going to say Washington County since the first of the year. Now remember, folks, when you go to sell your property, you are saying I have the best home. Hey, I looked around. I looked at every, Andy, I was over there off of 300 East in Washington, I looked around. I feel like I have the best house on the quarter mile. That is nice. Here is the issue. 724 properties hit the market in Washington County since January 1st.
Andy: Wow.
Jeremy: 700 competitors. Right? Sounds about accurate?
Carl: Yep.
Jeremy: That is what MLS is telling me.
Carl: Yep.
Jeremy: And by the way, I am talking about homes. I am not even talking about lots. If I talked about lots and water shares, there is another how many you think? A couple hundred?
Carl: Couple hundred.
Jeremy: 724 properties hit the market in Washington County since January 1st. Right? That is 700 new competitors that came to the market. Andy, how long have you lived in that house?
Andy: Seven years.
Jeremy: So you have been there seven years. The reason I asked is that is what I thought you said. A lot of our listeners have been in their property 5-7 years, 7-10 years, because a lot of people moved into the market. Right, Carl? Like ’05, ’06, ’07, ’08. Some of them ’10. But here is what is interesting. Values have come up since seven years ago in Washington County, Carl, what percentage you think?
Carl: I think we are right around 40%, 36%.
Jeremy: Since then. Close to 40%. So while Carl is telling us a story that is accurate and he is telling the truth, inventory is almost doubling. It doubled in Washington Fields. Right? We went from three to six months. At the same time, if I had told you seven years ago that your home value would go up 40%, the home values would go up 40%, how many homes would you have bought?
Carl: Everything.
Jeremy: Every one of them, right?
Carl: (Indiscernible) Right.
Jeremy: You would have bought all the $5 bills for $3 that you could have purchased. Okay?
Carl: Yep.
Jeremy: Right? Which is the math.
Andy: Makes sense.
Jeremy: We are saying hey, I have got a sale on $5 bills. They are on sale for $3. How many do you want? I want them all.
Carl: Yep.
Jeremy: But we did not know that. Did we?
Carl: Right.
Jeremy: So talk to me about a trend here because seven years, I would love, I love that you are in studio at seven years. What seems to kind of happen every 6-8 years, Carl?
Carl: Usually, it trends up for seven years and then it trends down. And you look at –
Jeremy: It is biblical, by the way. Seven years of famine. Seven years of planting.
Carl: Right. If you look at the trends, we crashed in the third quarter of 2007. That is when the trend started to go downward here in Washington County. And it went down until 2011. In 2012, we started the trend upward, and how it went, what is the math? Seven years. 2012 is when we started to trend upward. Now, I am not saying there is going to be a big crash. I do not think there is going to be a crash, but we are going to be gliding through 2019.
Jeremy: How many appraisals have you done? You and your company?
Carl: Our company, since we have opened up in 2008, we almost 21,000 here in Washington County.
Jeremy: We have two minutes. Two and a half minutes. I want that to settle in for people. I have got Carl on the show today. 21,000 appraisals. You might want to listen. Right? You might want to listen. Here is what is so fun for me. Everything you are saying is echoing what I have been saying, which clearly makes me feel pretty happy this morning. So 5% across the board. We feel like values are probably 5% overcooked. We have seen inventory in Washington Fields double. Where else? Where else is inventory going up? Everywhere.
Carl: Everywhere. Everywhere, but not to be alarmed. I do not want this to be people that panic and think that there is, that I need to make a huge, a 5% price reduction is not a very big price reduction.
Jeremy: If I am a seller, what do I do today because I want to sell and take advantage of a great market?
Carl: You want to reduce it 5%. It is like chasing that ball down the –
Jeremy: We talked about this.
Carl: We talked about this. You do not, you just want to get ahead of the ball. It is going to calm down. Usually, our market is spurred by the Parade of Homes which is coming up next weekend. A lot of buyers come in. So we are going to see some more buying right in the next near future.
Jeremy: 60 days.
Carl: 60 days. And so, I suspect that jet is just going to coast through 2019. I do not see a big fall. I do not see a big rise. I see it stable for the next year.
Jeremy: What if somebody says I really do not trust my agent? I want to call you and get a third-party appraisal. What is it going to cost them and how do they call you?
Carl: We have got a variety of products that we offer people from $200 to $400 for a full appraisal for a typical home. If your home is a little bit bigger, we charge a little bit more, but that will give you a full valuation of letting us come in, and like you said, give you a diagnostic of why your house is not selling.
Jeremy: Yeah, and by the way guys, we talked about this fun website. I almost forgot for a while that we had even created it. We created it years ago. When the market was crashing, we created this page called Why My Home Won’t Sell dot com. And when you go there, it is just a home marketing audit. And all you do is plug in your information, and then what we do is not a solicitation of a listing. I want to be very clear about that. We simply look at three categories: price, condition, and marketing. And we diagnose it. Right? We do an audit. I know no one likes an audit. But guess what? Would you, again, Carl, if I told you seven years ago that your value had come up, and Andy and everyone in this room, 40%, you would have said are you serious? But people want their value to have come up 45% and now they are frustrated. Are people going to miss out on this market because they are clinging onto last summer?
Carl: Yes, they will.
Jeremy: It is going to happen.
Carl: You have got to look forward.
Jeremy: How do they call you, Carl?
Carl: Our phone number is 435-627-0019. You can talk to anyone of our appraisers, me, Nick Lyman, Evan Wilkins, Jerry Johnson, Kenny Rawlings. We have got a whole crew over there that can help you.
Jeremy: Yep, R1. Literally, R the letter, 1 the number. You can Google it. Thank you, Carl.
Carl: Thank you for having me, Jeremy. Appreciate it. It is always a pleasure.
Andy: Jeremy Larkin with St. George Real Estate here on News Radio 94.9, 890, KDXU. Thanks, Jeremy.

The “Retirement” show for Mike McGary – 40+ years on air! (St. George Real Estate Radio Show)

After 41 years total on air… 35 in STG… 22 years on the open mic and nearly 5 years as our in studio co-host and guest, The great Mike McGary signs off on his final show! Today we ask him about the highlights (and low lights ) of thousands of shows, 4 AM wake ups, and being nagged by the public about their favorite city or county complaints! It’s been a great ride, cheers to you and your career and to your next phase! 🥂🙏🏼👊🏼

Jeremy: … of the morning, and what we are going to do Jesse is we are actually going to want to back that up because we want to capture Mike. I did not let you know that. Yeah, we are going to want to back that up.
Jesse: I was trying to, but he would not turn around.
Jeremy: It is okay. It is okay.
Mike: I told him to back my (indiscernible)
Jeremy: Just back it up. Well, I know, well you know what, there were words inserted there, that was very nice by the way. So the back of you is your best asset. I know, I get it. I hope your wife is listening this morning. Jeremy Larkin, host of the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive. Do you want to hear what I put on Facebook Live?
Mike: I do not know. Do I? Okay sure.
Jeremy: I got some information from Bart Taylor. Now, I hope I did not get it wrong. After 41 total years on the air, yeah?
Mike: Yeah.
Jeremy: 35 in St. George, 22 years on the open program, and nearly five years as our co-host.
Mike: That is right. We are probably four.
Jeremy: Yeah. The great Mike McGary signs off on his final show. Today we ask him about the highlights and lowlights, and I am sure there have been plenty of lowlights, of thousands of shows, 4am wakeups, and being nagged by the public about their favorite city or county complaints.
Mike: That has happened, yeah.
Jeremy: Because they are hoping you can get the pothole fixed out there in front of their home.
Mike: Well, I have connections.
Jeremy: I know you do.
Mike: I know the people.
Jeremy: The mayor is coming in. So who will be on with you for the last Open Mike?
Mike: My family actually.
Jeremy: Are they really coming in?
Mike: My wife is coming in.
Jeremy: That is so good.
Mike: I have three sons who are in town. My daughter will be on the phone, and my brother is here. So it is all good.
Jeremy: This is so good.
Mike: It is going to be good.
Jeremy: This is so good. So guys, I am Jeremy Larkin. I am the host of the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive, and we are going to talk, this is fun today for me. This is such a great break from just real estate talk. So we are going to have two minutes of real estate talk. I want to remind our friends and clients that our, we call it the Dollar Menu, the Dollar Menu expires today. So we did this program for a month where if you are buying a home in St. George and you hire us to represent you, you can qualify to sell your home for a buck. A dollar. How many clients did we have? Five? Five this month? Something like that. Something.
Jesse: Five, yeah.
Jeremy: Something like that.
Jesse: I think so.
Jeremy: So the funny part is people go what is the catch? Well, the catch is you need to buy another home in St. George. That is fine.
Jesse: Right.
Jeremy: That is the catch. There is no other catch. It is a dollar. So we will see settlement statements at the title company that say listing brokerage commission $1, and it expires today. We said we would do it only for January. We committed we would do it only for January, and we are doing it only for January.
Jesse: Right.
Jeremy: Okay, so we will be shooting an email out to our database this morning, but if you have questions about that, pick up the phone and call us after the show. Or you can call us right now if you want. Someone will answer probably.
Jesse: Yeah, probably.
Jeremy: 275-1690. 275-1690 or google The Larkin Group, and just, gosh, contact us. So that is number one. The $1 listing program does end today, and if you do not qualify for the $1 program, you will qualify for our, we had two things going. We had what we called Christmas in January, which is our up to $10,000 savings program and you will qualify. So get in on it. If you thought about selling your home, as a matter of fact, if you are planning to sell your home in February, and this is what tips you over, then let it tip you over. You do not have to list your home today. You could not list your home today. We could not –
Jesse: You could not get it all done and do it right.
Jeremy: We could not fill out the paperwork and photograph your home and bring our staging consultant through and all that stuff. Okay. So thank you, Robert MacFarlane for the, I look sharp, brother, or are you talking to Jesse? I guess you were talking to me. Secondarily, the Best of Southern Utah. So St. George News is running the Best of Southern Utah, and I want to just prep all of our listeners that we are, we will be vying for the title of Best Real Estate Team in southern Utah. So be aware. I think we are ten or maybe even fourteen days out from voting, but we have been nominated and we want this. Kevin Chavez, we know this town. Yes, we do. Yes, we do, my friend.
Jesse: That is going to be pretty cool. How do we go vote? Who votes?
Jeremy: There will be a link. The public can vote, and the public can vote every single day, and we will have a link that will be produced that will be something like the Best of Southern Utah dot com the Larkin Group. I do not know what it is. They will provide it for us.
Jesse: Cool.
Jeremy: That is the deal. Real estate sales, by the way, in southern Utah are strong, folks. Strong. If you have not been on our YouTube channel, we put some great content out there talking about the market being really great, just not quite as great as some people want.
Jesse: Well, and not as great as it has been.
Jeremy: Yeah.
Jesse: It is starting to stabilize.
Jeremy: But not as great as it has been for who?
Jesse: For sellers.
Jeremy: For sellers.
Jesse: For buyers, this is great.
Jeremy: See buying and selling is like a marriage. And if only one person is happy that is usually a recipe for disaster. Right?
Jesse: I never thought about it that way.
Jeremy: Yeah, so sellers were really happy last summer –
Jesse: Yeah.
Jeremy: — because they could do whatever they wanted. They could like run over the, they could pull up their car on to the front lawn and kick stuff over and just kind of be reckless teenagers —
Jesse: Right.
Jeremy: — and say I want what I want. But that is not a healthy real estate market. So, the market is better than it really virtually been in a decade, yet we have some sellers who are saying well, maybe I just will not sell my home because I cannot get what I want. And if you go to our YouTube channel, YouTube dot com slash Go St. George TV, couple of videos you are going to want to watch where I talk about the fact that people will look back on this time and they will say I did not want to sell because of what? Because I could not get what?
Jesse: I could not get what I wanted. I could not get the right price.
Jeremy: Yeah, and if I sell, then I will have to buy what?
Jesse: At the high price.
Jeremy: Yeah. What they did not take into account is what they cannot control, which is interest rates.
Jesse: Interest rates. I have that conversation all the time because people think well, man, I just cannot do that. I cannot, unless you went through that whole scenario really strategizing with a mortgage guy and –
Jeremy: And a good agent.
Jesse: — and a good agent, you really do not know what you can or what you are costing yourself if you do not.
Jeremy: Yeah, yeah, I promise you whatever you read on Zillow or whatever, it was not enough for you to actually run through all of your options.
Jesse: If you are thinking about a three, $400,000 investment, it is probably pretty important to really go down the whole road of investigation.
Jeremy: What are all of my options? Right?
Jesse: Well, yeah right. What are they?
Jeremy: Because –
Jesse: You could stay, you could sell, you could refinance, you could rent that one out and buy another one. There are all kinds of stuff you could do.
Jeremy: Because if you want to move, let’s pretend that interest rates pop up to 6% in two years. You will look back and it will be a regretful moment –
Jesse: Yeah.
Jeremy: — because now your mortgage payment will be two or three hundred dollars higher and you do not have any control over that. All right. So again, call us, 275-1690 to take advantage of our Christmas in July, July, January slash dollar menu. Or just to talk about your situation and have us strategize. Okay, Mike. Here we go. Let’s do this.
Mike: Yes.
Jesse: Here is the man.
Jeremy: So 41 years, 35 years in St. George.
Mike: In St. George, yeah.
Jeremy: Okay, so give us the best and the worst. What are a couple of highlights from being on the air this long?
Mike: Well, that I had a job and paycheck for all that time. I guess would be pretty good. My career is, I think, has been too fast and at number one that is on the air. It is the news. It is the morning show. The other half has been the sports, and I have been involved in sports for nearly that same length of time. I am going to go there first because it is easy.
Jeremy: Calling games for who?
Mike: For, I did it for Dixie College slash Dixie State University now. Traveled with the team for twenty years. In fact, yesterday on the show I had former coaches, great coaches on the air with me. I had Dave Rose, now the head coach at BYU.
Jeremy: Correct.
Mike: And the head BYU baseball coach, Mike Littlewood, who was also here.
Jeremy: Oh, that is cool.
Mike: So I had them on the air.
Jeremy: By the way, where is Croshaw now?
Mike: He is semi-retired, kind of helping out here and there.
Jeremy: He is still here.
Mike: He is still in the town. Oh yeah, he lives here.
Jeremy: Okay. I knew he was involved with –
Mike: So anyway, got the opportunity of calling four national championships on the junior college level, two of which Dixie won.
Jeremy: Were you at the, do you go back as far as ’85 or no?
Mike: No.
Jeremy: That was pre-you.
Mike: I actually came here in ’84, but the great man Larry Jewell was still the voice.
Jeremy: It was Larry Jewell. Okay. That is, I was ten years old and I was at the game in Wichita, Kansas. We stayed, this was so great. I was ten years old and we stayed at the Holiday Inn Holodome, and the Holodome in the 80s was a thing because it has a miniature golf course and an arcade and a pool inside.
Mike: Right. Right.
Jeremy: And I was like –
Mike: Wow. You have reached the top, huh?
Jeremy: We really arrived. We drove all the way to Wichita. So Larry Jewell.
Mike: Larry Jewell. I actually, my claim to fame –
Jeremy: That takes me back.
Mike: — I ran the board here in St. George.
Jeremy: There you go.
Mike: So I heard that, but I got to do the national championship in 2001, Andy? Andy did it with me by the way. Andy Griffin over in the corner there.
Jeremy: So good.
Mike: So I got to call a national basketball championship, which Dixie won. I got to call in 2004 the national championship baseball which Dixie won. The only downer was that the Dixie football team twice played in a national championship for junior colleges, both here in town, both at the Rotary Bowl, and they lost both to the same team.
Jeremy: Yes.
Mike: Kind of rough one. (Indiscernible)
Jeremy: You know that stinks. Amen, and I remember that well. And the Rotary Bowl always ends up being freezing because by about two o’clock the sun is past the stadium –
Mike: Going down.
Jeremy: Right and then you are on the concrete. So yeah, you were involved in some really cool stuff.
Mike: Really cool stuff, and I could go on and on obviously, and I have been at, I really do not know. I have been very fortunate, a number of state championships. Thank you, Region 9.
Jeremy: Yeah, tons. Tons.
Mike: They have been super. Baseball, basketball, football. Region 9 teams have won them all multiple times. So I have been able to be there and call those games as well.
Jeremy: Do you have any idea how many games? Could you guestimate how many games that you have done live color commentary for?
Mike: Andy and I were actually trying to figure this out. And we, our best estimate, over 3,000.
Jeremy: Over, over 3000 games, and what is baffling to me is when I listen to you or anyone else calling a game. Hey it is Smith to Stout and Stout to McFarthen. I am looking at (indiscernible)
Mike: Right.
Jeremy: And it is Jesse. Jesse Poll, he is really great junior out of Wichita, Kansas. He has been doing a great job. Oh, hey we have got a fumble. It is like you really get good at that, right?
Mike: I do not want to give away all of my secrets. No, you kind of get into a flow of things and there is no doubt. I had all kinds of notes. I did not make the pro-level where they have a little insert in your ear and there is some guy in your ear going it is Bob Smith with the tackle. I never had that. I may have had Andy going Bob Smith and he would punch me in the side.
Jeremy: Yeah.
Mike: You get a feel. You get to learn from it. So many games over the years. It has been incredible.
Jeremy: 3000 games. Oh and I have heard Mike for so long, so long. I used to listen to all the Dixie State University games when they were on the road.
Mike: Twenty years I traveled with Dixie.
Jeremy: Twenty years. Yeah, that is incredible. So 4am is typical wake up time?
Mike: Probably 4:30, I guess. I have to be in studio by no later than 5:30. Well, until this week, and I sleep in a little bit. But anyway, to get here and get things set up and get ready to go. There is lots of prep prior to, so sometimes I do it the day before so I can –
Jeremy: The key is Mike has figured out, I figured out something that I learned from Mike. He did not realize I learned it from him. Mike lives literally two minutes –
Mike: Yes.
Jeremy: It is exactly two minutes is what I would estimate over the hill. Like he just drives up the street and comes down and parks. Then I decided, of course, a year ago to move two minutes from my office.
Mike: And it works.
Jeremy: It is incredible because I leave for leadership meetings at 7:28 that start at 7:30. That kind of stuff. Or I will show up in my, I shot a live video on Facebook yesterday from my bike trainer, and I got off at 7:25, and then I went into the office to a meeting. Because I could just run home and shower. It is no big deal. So, this is amazing. 3000 games. All these years on the air with the Open Mike Show. Who do you remember, is there anyone that you remember specifically that came in the studio beside the people that you like locally? You love interviewing the mayors –
Mike: And there have been a lot of good ones locally. It has been fun over the years. But –
Jeremy: What stands out in your mind?
Mike: I think a couple of politicians who have come down. I mentioned this the other day. I have interviewed all, the last six governors of the state of Utah –
Jeremy: Wow.
Mike: — going back to, wow, now I cannot think of his name. My mind just went blank right there.
Jeremy: I am thinking back to Norm Bangerter.
Mike: Right prior to Norm Bangerter. Norm Bangerter ws the second one. Anyway, right up until our current mayor here. Or governor, excuse me. That has been a lot of fun. I have been able to interview some well-known athletes here on the this one, and one of the fun ones I did was Joe Namath.
Jeremy: Oh wow.
Mike; Now, it was not during his, during the heyday of his career mind you. He was a little bit older, but he was fun. That was probably one of the funner ones.
Jeremy: And he was cool and respectful.
Mike: He was very good. Very respectful, very neat to have around. I think some of the highlights have just been sometimes you would not think this, they would come in and we would get talking and we would get into the best of discussions. And I have discussed all kinds of political things, all kinds of local events, and I have really enjoyed it.
Jeremy: By the way –
Mike: Yes.
Jeremy: Scott Matheson.
Mike: Scott Matheson, thank you.
Jeremy: I looked. Do you know, who was the first governor of the state of Utah? People, this is a funny one. I would not even have thought of this.
Mike: I was from Idaho, so I did not know this.
Jeremy: I would not have even thought of this. Brigham Young.
Mike: Okay.
Jeremy: Thank you, Wikipedia.
Mike: There you go.
Jeremy: Isn’t that interesting? Brigham Young was the first governor of the state of Utah. So these guys come in, I do not know who will ever hear this. Is there anyone you remember that was like a pain? And obviously if it is someone local, you cannot name it. Is there anyone that you have spoken with that you said, okay, that guy or gal, that was a problem?
Mike: Yea, I have had interviews when they, it just did not go well. And this is going to sound really sexist, and I know this, but I am sorry. But years ago, they brought in the winners of the local queen pageant. And here is what I ask, and I do not think I am going to be able to remember this, so I can say it again. I just, well, it is good to have you in, first of all. And your name is so-and-so. I just want to get a feel. Which part of the area do you live in? And she looked at me and she said, I do not understand the question.
Jeremy: This is so good.
Mike: Let me just tell you the 20-minute interview became seven minutes and we were out of there. Sometimes people are so nervous. They do not know what to say.
Jeremy: I do not think it is sexist. It is just what happens.
Mike: It is just what happens. That was a tough one. I have done a lot of politicians and that has been fun because of the local races. We tried to bring all the candidates and interview them. They range from being really good. The thing is, whether they are good on the air or not does not mean they are a good or not a good candidate. So I hope people realize that.
Jeremy: Hey, Jesse, which, here we go. Which area are you in? Hurricane, just say Hurricane.
Jesse: I think I am in Hurricane. Is it Hurrican or Hurricane?
Jeremy: Did that come over the air? I did not mean my whisper. That is incredible. Which area are you from? I do not understand the question. That does remind me of some snafus of the like I do not, is it the Miss Universe. There have been some funny –
Mike: There has been some big time.
Jesse: We have had some on this because Jeremy never tells me what he is going to be talking about. And I get asked these questions and I am like –
Jeremy: He has pulled up lame a couple times, but I love him. I love him. Man, I love the guy. What would you, that is so incredible, so what do you feel like, what is the biggest challenge of doing what you have done? What is the hardest part? There has to be hardest part.
Mike: I think really kind of feel like I am at least semi-prepared for whatever may come up that day. Now, I will never know everything, but I try to look, I try to get a feel, especially when it comes to the talk show portion of the day because I always, I feel like somebody is going to call up and ask a question. So I will go through the paper, well, not the paper anymore. I go through the internet, I bring it up on line, I look at things. I may only know the headline, but if someone calls and says hey did you see this? You bet. I did. Isn’t that amazing that that happened? I have no idea what the rest of the story –
Jeremy: And they will tell you what the story is.
Mike: And they will tell me. What would you think about it? And then we can get into a discussion. There are little ways of doing it.
Jeremy: Yeah, you are giving away a trade secret. I think it is interesting because I hear about Rush Limbaugh or these guys, he loves to ruffle the papers on the air.
Mike: Yes, yes.
Jeremy: But yeah, they have stacks of stuff because they are kind of going I could get into anything today.
Mike: Right.
Jeremy: Now, of course, those guys have the benefit of a call screener.
Mike: Absolutely. We tried that once here.
Jeremy: Did you really?
Mike: Yeah, it did not really work out well.
Jeremy: So you get caught, you are on the spot, you do the Open Mike program here at nine o’clock.
Mike: Yeah.
Jeremy: Is this the family?
Mike: Yep. There is, looks like my wife is out there. That is my son –
Jeremy: Oh, this is so fun.
Mike: — you can see there.
Jeremy: This is so fun. We are looking on the little –
Mike: It is a little entry video.
Jeremy: It is an entry video. That, by the way, that, that TV monitor was brought here by NASA in 1968.
Mike: That is mine. Just kidding.
Jeremy: That is incredible. He is like that is how I watch, stream Netflix.
Mike: That is right.
Jeremy: But these folks call in, let’s talk about the Open Mike program for a minute.
Mike: Sure.
Jeremy: What have people most complained to you about? What is the most typical, because it is kind of like the vent in the spectrum.
Mike: Yes, it is. It is. I will tell you honestly it is national politics, national politics. People want to talk about what the President is doing, what the Congress is doing or not doing. What is good, what is bad, and a little bit unfortunately, the split we see in the nation is right here in this area. I have tried to interject other programs involving more local. Now there are some good local issues. Water is always a great local issue. Growth is always a great local issue, but over and all, they seem to like to talk about the national, and one thing that was surprising to me. I have trouble getting on state issues. They do not want to talk about it.
Jeremy: They do not want to talk about it.
Mike: They will complain but I feel like people are going to say, they are going to sit back and wait and then they are going to complain –
Jeremy: So it is either national –
Mike: Or local.
Jeremy: — or I cannot believe these guys are developing another subdivision.
Mike: Yeah, that is big time. How about our water? And I am not saying right or wrong. I am just saying these are the hot button issues. And have been for a long time.
Jeremy: How often do you have to, Jesse, I do not know, man. Jesse is in sales, so he is on the phone a lot with angry people. How often have you had to just cut a call off? Like hey man, you had to hang up on them.
Mike: Let’s just say numerous times. No, it happens. I will be honest
Jeremy: (Indiscernible)
Mike: I have tried, very few. Very fortunately very few. I think back to my career starting up in Pocatello, Idaho. Probably on two hands, I could honestly say –
Jeremy: Here we go, mother –
Mike: Yeah, I have been called a thing or two. And probably the only, less than ten times in 40 years. So that is not too bad. Now we get into discussions, and I think that is kind of what led me in my Open Mike Show to say we are not going to get personal. You can disagree with what I say. You can disagree with the events. You can disagree with the people, but you cannot get personal about the people.
Jeremy: Yeah.
Mike: And for the most part, people have been good. And I have appreciated that because it has kind of help keep us on a little bit better level. I am not a national talk show host. I do not want to be. I do not want to go where they think they have to go. So.
Jeremy: Yeah, and I do not think, I think it is very easy to go personal. I think –
Mike: Easy to do.
Jeremy: It is so easy to go personal about the people, easy to go personal on you. Well, you know what, Mike, I have been listening to you for five years, and all you ever do –
Mike: Right. Right.
Jeremy: All you ever do is one of the great statements that we make and we love to make —
Mike: We all do it, don’t we?
Jeremy: — this to our family and our spouses, whatever we do. Right? We love to say all you ever do is, which is I am always trying to teach my kids okay, no absolutes.
Mike: Right.
Jeremy: Always, only, never. Not helpful language. Not helpful language. What are you going to do now? So as we wrap this program today, now what? Because you are going, you are going to walk out of here at ten o’clock? Eleven or will you be here for a while?
Mike: Well, probably one o’clock. There is a little get together from eleven to one today here.
Jeremy: Yeah. Yeah. Yeah,
Mike: Honestly, for the very near future, sleep in. Seriously, just kind of take it easy. I do have family down. Right now, I do not have a lot planned. My wife and I have a few trips that we are going to be taking. We are going to become, I am going to become a full-time grandpa, at least for the near future. And we will see where we go from there.
Jeremy: You do appreciate that.
Jesse: I do.
Mike: I love it. I am going to Portland in April or March, two little kids.
Jeremy: Do you know what is cool? And I think you will appreciate this. So Jesse has got how many grandkids?
Jesse: Four.
Jeremy: Four. And how many are in Boston?
Jesse: Two.
Jeremy: Is it two in Boston?
Jesse: Two in Boston (indiscernible)
Jeremy: He and his wife, they are breaking themselves up, down to get there at least twice a year.
Jesse: Well, four times.
Jeremy: Four times a year (indiscernible)
Jesse: We go four times.
Mike: That is really good.
Jeremy: Right. So you appreciate like and Jesse gets this.
Jesse: My wife gets it. She reminds me that the kids are only going to be little once and they will, it is going to matter.
Mike: Yep. Yep.
Jesse: Right now.
Jeremy: Yeah. Now we cannot forget. Andy, you are to remind us. When this program ends, we have to get the last in-studio photo of the three of us guys. We have to have this. Okay. You got it? Because, by the way, the contract with Cherry Creek, they cancel it if you do not remind us. Okay. So I am sorry. I hope Cherry Creek is listening right now. Mike, it has been, we have got two minutes, right?
Mike: Yeah. Yeah.
Jeremy: It has been such a pleasure. Honestly, I mean it. I just mean it. You are, and it is hard. It is almost emotional. Mike is a man of character and he is a man of credibility. I worked with his son doing some real estate –
Mike: That is right. Yeah.
Jeremy: — and he is just a good man, and I think that that is being lost with the Matt Lauers and Rush Limbaughs of the world just to use a couple of public personalities who are either out of control or secretly out of control.
Mike: Right.
Jeremy: It has been such a good time. I cannot believe it. I cannot believe this is the day.
Mike: Looking back, it is always like oh my gosh, where did that 35 years go? A couple of times during it, I am going oh my crud, is this ever going to end? I am sorry. That was –
Jeremy: But I feel the same way.
Mike: Sure we do.
Jeremy: And when it is great in real estate, when our clients, when we closed Hale and Dan Balthesar’s home two weeks ago and they are elderly and they needed our help, and they needed our help moving, and they needed our help putting multiple transactions together –
Mike: Right. Right.
Jeremy: — and we took this tiny fee to get it done, we were so happy.
Mike: Sure.
Jeremy: And the next day you have a deal fall out the day before closing and you just want to quit.
Mike: Highs and lows. Every career has it.
Jeremy: I have never felt so high and I have never felt so low. Ladies and gentleman, kudos and congrats to Mike McGary on his retirement and becoming a full-time grandpa.
Jesse: That is going to be awesome. Thanks, Mike.
Mike: You bet, guys.
Jeremy: If you have got questions, there is Mayor Pike. If you have got questions about, again, to take advantage, please, today of the Dollar Menu or our kind of Christmas in January, call us at 275-1690. Mike will give you a little bit more information. And Mike, we are going to hand this over to you. This is kind of first. Favorite people. We had these custom made in Fargo, North Dakota. It is a mantle, you will see. I hope this is on your mantle.
Mike: (Indiscernible)
Jeremy: On behalf of the Larkin Group. There you go. It is cool. It is very cool.
Mike: Jeremy, thank you.
Jeremy: Thank you.
Mike: Jesse, thank you.
Jeremy: Over and out guys.
Mike: All right. That is going to wind it up for another edition of the edition. Again, this has been the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive with the voice of St. George Real Estate. As always for more information, call 275-1690. Find them online at Sold in St. George dot com.

3 Buyers Bid Against Each Other for Coral Canyon Home – WHY?

Jeremy Larkin is on Spring Canyon Dr. in Coral Canyon (Washington City, UT) providing insight on the home pricing “sweet spot” that will take a “stale” listing to a seriously hot commodity. Typically creating MORE money for Sellers rather than LESS. Looking to buy a home? Check out our free home search:
http://www.stgeorgehomesearching.com/

Looking to sell a home? Check out our free home value report:
http://gostgeorgehomevalue.com/

Jeremy Larkin
Keller Williams
St. George and
Washington County, UT
Phone: 435-767-9821
Sales@GoStGeorge.com

Using (FREE!) Staging Consultant to Sell St. George Home in 3 days!

Have you thought about staging your home to sell it but figured it would just cost too much?? Most people have! In today’s video Jeremy Larkin explains how they sold the O’Roulian’s home for 100% of their asking price using their in-house, complementary staging consultant.

Learn more: https://stgeorgerealestatevideos.com/… Looking to buy a home? Check out our free home search: http://www.stgeorgehomesearching.com/ Looking to sell a home? Check out our free home value report: http://www.dixiehomevalue.com/ Jeremy Larkin / The Larkin Group Keller Williams St. George and Washington County, UT Phone: 435-767-9821 Sales@GoStGeorge.com www.SoldinStGeorge.com

Why Isn’t My Home Selling? WINNING (not LOSING $$) In a Shifting Real Estate Market

Larkin Group CEO Jeremy Larkin shot this video on 1/27/19 specifically for their Seller clients who are feeling a bit mystified at the shifting market in Washington County. Buyers are widely rejecting list prices after the craziest Seller’s market in a decade. Not surprisingly, the shift is similar to what California and Nevada are seeing. Leaning on experience gleaned from 1200+ home sales, Larkin outlines both the problem and solution in this St. George Real Estate overview. This video is a great watch even, and maybe ESPECIALLY, for other Realtors looking to better understand the dynamics of home pricing in a shifting market.

Looking to buy a home? Check out our free home search: http://www.stgeorgehomesearching.com/ Looking to sell a home? Check out our free home value report: http://gostgeorgehomevalue.com/ Jeremy Larkin Keller Williams St. George and Washington County, UT Phone: 435-767-9821 Sales@GoStGeorge.com

SIX HOME PRICING MISCONCEPTIONS THAT COST YOU MONEY (St. George Real Estate Morning Drive Show)

If you prefer to view and comment on Facebook vs. the YouTube video above, click here: Facebook Live.

Below is the actual St. George Real Estate Morning Drive show, hosted by St. George Real Estate Agent Jeremy Larkin, word for word! Enjoy and please share if you find it valuable! 

Jeremy Larkin and The Larkin Group @ Keller Williams Realty can be reached by calling 435-767-9821, or emailing sales@gostgeorge.com. 

Mike: KDXU News time. It is 8:35. It is a Thursday. Good morning and welcome. It is also time for another edition of the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive. We welcome in the voice of St. George Real Estate. Here is Jeremy Larkin.
Jeremy: Thank you, Mike. And Robert is offended that you did not say voices.
Mike: The voices of St. George Real Estate –
Jeremy: Thank you.
Robert: I am not at all.
Mike: How about if I say Robert and Jeremy. Now Jeremy is mad.
Jeremy: Robert J. DeBry. I mean MacFarlane.
Robert: Robert J. DeBry and Associates.
Jeremy: I had the resume and I thought it said Robert J. DeBry, and I am like he is interviewing for a real estate position?
Robert: Because I am Robert J.
Jeremy: But then I looked again, and it was just Robert J. MacFarlane.
Mike: Just.
Robert: Just.
Mike: Just.
Robert: Just. Not bad though.
Jeremy: I will take it. Very good morning. Here is a fun trivia for you this morning because it is a beautiful January day in St. George, Utah. I was driving my child over to la escuela, as they say in Latino America. You guys understand, right? This school. Robert, I think you understood.
Robert: Oh, okay. Got it. That was a tough one for me.
Jeremy: I want to make sure. We are going to do a little Spanish course today. So I am headed over to Tonaquint Intermediate School and we pass Southgate Golf Course. I said, Matt, look at the golf course. And it was covered in frost.
Robert: Frost.
Jeremy: It looked like snow.
Robert: Frosty white.
Jeremy: Yeah, it looked like snow. He said man, that is the whitest I have ever seen it besides when it snowed. And I helped him understand. Gang, if you are not a golfer, do you realize, so do you know what the rule is with the frost in the morning?
Robert: I do not.
Jeremy: So they will not, Southgate Golf Club, by the way, is owned by the City of St. George. Golf Club, golf course. I think club is a little liberal. They will not let players out until the frost is off. And really the frost only has to be off on the first hole because once it is off on the first hole they send them out, and then of course, the sun is going to hit everywhere else. But that is the deal. So this morning, the second that sun hits that fairway or that first hole and green, then they will send people out.
Robert: Interesting.
Jeremy: You did not know that?
Robert: I did not know that. I am not quite as much of a golfer as I probably should be.
Jeremy: Should be. I have news for everybody. You do not need to be a golfer to be in real estate. People think that real estate agents just play golf and have lunch with friends.
Robert: Yep, I think that is it. Right?
Jeremy: I do not play much golf, and I really do not have lunch often with friends. I have lunch occasionally with clients. But I am going to get out tomorrow. So headed out, thank you to my brother-in-law. He has got free golf at Sand Hollow. Sand Hollow was just, if you guys did not see this, there was an incredible article in Golf Digest talking about, it was a feature on Sand Hollow Golf Course out there in Hurricane, out there near, Hurricane, Utah, near Sand Hollow, what do you want to call it? Reservoir.
Robert: That is what it is called. Lake.
Jeremy: Yeah, so very cool. And I will have the opportunity tomorrow afternoon to go out with these guys with my father, and it is going to be a great time. But work must be done, and we have got to sell some real estate first, don’t we?
Robert: We have to. It is not an option.
Jeremy: It is not an option. It is not an option. Gang, if you are watching us on Facebook Live, say hi. Shoot out some hearts or a thumbs up or let us know that you are there, or if you have got questions for us, we are on, this fun.
Robert: We are on three.
Jeremy: We are on three phones.
Robert: We are on three. I have got Facebook Live on mine. We have got Jeremy’s Facebook Live.
Jeremy: And YouTube Live.
Robert: YouTube, YouTube Live.
Jeremy: How do you like that?
Robert: It is a new age.
Jeremy: And, of course, we are on the radio, which you are listening to.
Robert: Thanks, Mike, appreciate that.
Jeremy: Thank you, Mike. Incredible. So check this out. If you are a YouTuber, and some folks will say yeah, I do not do Facebook Live, YouTube dot come slash Go St. George TV. G-O-S-T George TV. YouTube dot come slash Go St. George TV, and you will see us broadcasting live. Robert is running live and I am running live on Facebook.
Robert: Why not?
Jeremy: It is wild. It is wild. 94.9FM, 890AM. We are going to talk about something really cool today. So Robert is with me. Robert has been in my organization now for, pushing three years?
Robert: Pushing four.
Jeremy: Pushing four. Thank you. Jesse is over that hump. So Robert is with us. He is, I talk to him on Facebook. He is a, I actually think he is a home-pricing and home-selling expert and has been part of us now selling, I think we are at like almost 1200 homes.
Robert: I do, too.
Jeremy: That is a lot. Folks, that is a lot of properties. The average homeowner buys or sells every seven years, and of course, once they are an adult, then they are in the home.
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: It does not start at age zero.
Robert: Yeah. You know you have been selling real estate a long time when you actually, you see a home hit the market, and you are like that home looks familiar. And then you realize oh, that is because five years ago I sold that house.
Jeremy: We sold that. Yeah. It is fun, and I love to drive around and do that. And of course, I always tell my kids I sold that. I sold that. I sold that. I sold that. So it has been an interesting ride, and Robert is with us this morning, and we are going to be talking, so he really is. He is a home-pricing and home-selling expert. We are going to talk about the six pricing misconceptions that actually cost sellers money.
Robert: Is there only six?
Jeremy: There are a lot, but six is, man, I am telling you what.
Robert: It really boils down to these six.
Jeremy: Yeah, it boils down to these six, and it sounds like a lot. It is not a lot. It is really easy to digest, but this is a real issue right now because we have a lot of home owners, a lot of home sellers who are, they are aggravated right now. Why?
Robert: Mainly why because homes are sitting on the market. I was just sitting down with a client. Their home is actually for sale as a For Sale By Owner right up here on Bluff. And what happens a lot of times is for homes that were for sale by owner, they do not sell the home for a month –
Jeremy: Correct.
Robert: — maybe two.
Jeremy: Correct.
Robert: And then they reach out to a real estate agent and say hey, what am I doing wrong? So that is what ended up happening with this family over here on Bluff. And we sat down, and I noticed that in the $4-500,000 price range, the active homes on the market have been sitting there for an average of 102 days.
Jeremy: That is a long time.
Robert: That is an average, so some have been more. Obviously, some are less, but that is 106 homes sitting on the market for an average of 102 days. That is pretty –
Jeremy: Yes.
Robert: That is not typical.
Jeremy: And here is the perspective for people. Last summer, most homes under $500,000, I am not going to give any specific other than under 500, they were sold in 30 days or less, and some folks, we have sold homes that I was thinking about, a home that we sold over on, the Jenkins home on Canara in Green Springs. Pseudo-luxury home, $480,000. We had multiple offers.
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: We had two buyers competing. We sold another one in Greens Springs in Silverstone. Two buyers competing at $650,000 for that home.
Robert: And I am sure we have home builders listening to the show –
Jeremy: Yeah.
Robert: — and I bet you more now than it has been in probably the last three years, spec homes have been sitting on the market.
Jeremy: Yeah, and it is going to freak people out.
Robert: They were not having to really do a whole ton of work trying to sell those before –
Jeremy: No, no, no.
Robert: — and now it is a different game. Just to kind of, it seems like overnight.
Jeremy: It is interesting. This is so subtle that it throws people off. And so we have a lot of home sellers who are frustrated, like man, I thought it was a good market.
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: And what we want to talk about are the six pricing misconceptions that cost you money, and also reiterate that it is a great market.
Robert: The best really.
Jeremy: It is an incredible market. The market that we were in for a little bit there was actually unsustainable and was akin to giving your kid the keys to your Corvette and telling them to drive 120 down the freeway indefinitely and assuming that nothing was ever going to go wrong.
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: Okay, at some point, okay –
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: — he is going to hit something.
Robert: Yeah.
Jeremy: And that is what our real estate market was doing. It was careening out of control. You cannot have homes sell that quickly. You cannot have, look we had appreciation in 2005, remember. 36%. We all remember how that turned out.
Robert: Yeah. And I think that is probably the biggest challenge I hear more than anything is well, in 2005, and they are always going back to this, now we are looking at 14 years ago.
Jeremy: Right.
Robert: Kids that were in diapers are now driving cars. Right?
Jeremy: Yes.
Robert: That long ago. They are saying well, it was like this then. Why isn’t it like this now?
Jeremy: Correct.
Robert: And the reality is we are looking at two different eras.
Jeremy: Bingo.
Robert: Completely different eras.
Jeremy: It is two different times. So it is fascinating because I mentioned a home in Green Springs at $650,000. It was sold for another radio personality who we have mentioned on air before with another firm in town, and he was delighted when I had two buyers competing against each other to buy his home.
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: The interesting part is that there was a 30-day period where the home was actually listed too high.
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: Let’s just find out what the market will bring. And the second, the second that price was brought in line, we are going to share with folks today, Robert, that you cannot what a home?
Robert: You cannot underprice a home.
Jeremy: Not even possible. But Robert, I do not want to give my home away.
Robert: Right, and I understand that. We all understand that. Nobody does.
Jeremy: (Indiscernible)
Robert: Do you know anybody, Mike, can I have your house?
Mike: No.
Jeremy: No. No.
Robert: He is not going (indiscernible)
Jeremy: But Robert, I do not want to leave money on the table.
Robert: And we understand that. That is a valid concern. Right? Nobody wants to leave money on the table.
Jeremy: No.
Robert: So there is a strategy behind that.
Jeremy: And what we are saying is it is actually, this is incredible, I hope folks are listening who are selling right now, considering selling. Builders, you cannot underprice a home. It is actually not possible, and we are going to talk about why.
Robert: Right. Even in horrible markets, right, even in a full buyer’s market, which we are not in one, unless you are selling in the 600 and above, and really in some cases, depending on how unique the property is, that is not even a buyer’s market. Right? But for the most part, we are in a seller’s market from top to bottom.
Jeremy: We actually are.
Robert: So if you are in a seller’s market, what does that mean?
Jeremy: That means that the benefit, the advantages to the seller that there is a less supply, right, and the buyers are really hungry to gobble up the limited supply.
Robert: Yeah, it is the iPhone launch. Right? There are not as many iPhones on the market, but they are going to charge you $1200 and you are going to happily go pay that –
Jeremy: Correct.
Robert: — which is not always true, and that cannot happen forever. Right?
Jeremy: Correct.
Robert: I remember reading an article about Apple doing that, running into issues with that, and at the same time, because we are in that seller’s market, do you think Apple is like do you know what? I am really worried about selling this. Could I have asked $50 more?
Jeremy: Right. Right.
Robert: Am I leaving $50 on the table? No, they are not.
Jeremy: And this is so interesting. So let’s talk about this. Six pricing misconceptions. Okay. I am going to overview them. Is that fair enough?
Robert: Yeah.
Jeremy: So, Jeremy Larkin here. Host of the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive. And I want to share something. I do not say this to impress. It is to impress upon you, right? So 1200 homes is where we are at as a real estate group here in Washington County. If you can imagine that 25% of the contracts fall out, as a matter of fact, this last year, 19.6% of the contracts, contracts that buyers wrote on our listings, 19.6% fell apart.
Robert: For one reason or another.
Jeremy: Yeah, the appraisal came in low. The buyer got cold feet.
Robert: The inspection came back poorly.
Jeremy: The inspection came back poorly. They could not get financing. Right? Whatever. All right. 19.6%. So for us to sell 1200 homes, we actually had to sell, to put on the market, we had to deal with 120%.
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: But the reality is it was not because we probably spoke to 250 or 300% as many clients –
Robert: To get those.
Jeremy: — to get to there. Okay. So understand, folks, that we have literally had thousands, this is where the –
Robert: Yeah.
Jeremy: I am even baffled saying this out loud. We have actually had tens of thousands of real estate conversations. Tens of thousands of conversations with buyers and sellers. Okay. So, it just gives some credibility to what we are talking about here. These scenarios never change. It does not matter whether you are in Cincinnati or Miami, Florida or St. George, Utah, these are realities. Okay. Six pricing misconceptions. Your home is not worth what you paid.
Robert: Nope.
Jeremy: Well, it could be, but it is not worth what you need. But Robert, I need 450.
Robert: We all need a million dollars. Right?
Jeremy: It is not worth what you want.
Robert: Nope.
Jeremy: It is not worth what your neighbor says.
Robert: I disagree with you there. My neighbor, he knows a lot about real estate.
Jeremy: I know.
Robert: He has sold two or three homes.
Jeremy: He has sold two or three homes and he drives for Andrus Trucking, but he is a real estate expert. It is not worth what your neighbor says. It is not worth what another agent no matter how bad they want to get your business –
Robert: Yep.
Jeremy: And it is not even worth what it costs to rebuild.
Robert: I think it is interesting. You say it is not what another agent says. That includes yours truly.
Jeremy: Right. Right because do we determine the value of a home?
Robert: Absolutely not.
Jeremy: Absolutely not. So we do not make the market. We just interpret the market. So if Robert goes out or myself or one of our team and you hire us to sell your home, we do not make the market. We do not come in and say well, I think it is actually worth 425. We may say that based on all the data and that is what we do, but we do not make the market.
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: In every market, for every product, who determines value, Robert?
Robert: The buyer. That is a t-shirt. That is a cell phone. That is a car.
Jeremy: Yes, everything.
Robert: It does not matter. A burger.
Jeremy: Yep. Buyers determine value.
Robert: Always. That is the free market.
Jeremy: The greatest example on the whole planet right now, at least I think it is the greatest example, I am a Disneyland fan. And I heard 30 days ago they raised their prices again.
Robert: Yeah.
Jeremy: And it came across Facebook or something and I saw one of these blogs that is like a Disney insider’s blog. And what they said is does not matter. It is not deterring anyone. Right?
Robert: Netflix is another example.
Jeremy: Oh my gosh, right.
Robert: They raised the price of Netflix. They did a survey. How many people are going to stop using Netflix? 76% said that it was not going to phase them at all. Of the remaining piece, only 3% said they would probably stop watching Netflix. 3% and they raised it like, I think it was like, they raised it like $5 or something like that for the top plan.
Jeremy: Right. Right. So buyers determine value. And here is the point. You may say well wait, if Netflix and Disney are raising their prices, I can, too. No, what we are saying is the market is determining value.
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: So today, they said it is $190 to buy a one-day hopper to Disney (indiscernible)
Robert: I have got a sidebar.
Jeremy: Good grief.
Robert: My sister she lives up in Salt Lake. Her and her family, it has been ten years since they have been to Disneyland.
Jeremy: Right.
Robert: They just went this last week. She has got a sweet picture of the whole family all of them wearing fanny packs like it is 1980.
Jeremy: Everything is just regurgitated.
Robert: Isn’t it so funny?
Jeremy: It is 1980 again.
Robert: It is so funny, man.
Jeremy: It is Marty McFly. Right? 1985.
Robert: They were the best fanny packs. Good strong, there are six of them, all with fanny packs.
Jeremy: You know what? I think the next time I am going back I am wearing a fanny pack.
Robert: You should rock it, man.
Jeremy: And you realize they spent thousands on tickets.
Robert: They did.
Jeremy: And it is not going to deter people. So until Disney raises their price to a level that the market says oooo, now that is out of range. Right? Here is another thing. So folks, one of the challenges we have is that how many Disneylands are there? There are about a half dozen.
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: There is Disneyland, Disney World, Tokyo, Paris, are there six? Are there two more that I do not remember. Okay. Maybe that is it.
Robert: Asking the wrong guy.
Jeremy: Okay. How many homes are hitting the market every month right now in Washington County?
Robert: About 300.
Jeremy: Another three, and by the way, as many as six in a big month.
Robert: Oh yeah.
Jeremy: Three to six hundred homes –
Robert: Like the one we are coming up to. Right.
Jeremy: Right. We are in the biggest month right now. See the difference is, folks, we are not Disneyland. These are homes, and even though you love your home, and I know that you, I realize how much time you spent on the custom cabinets and the custom closet inserts, and that was important to you. Right? You put those in for your enjoyment. And Robert, did you enjoy them?
Robert: Oh, absolutely.
Jeremy: Right. Did you put them in for the next buyer to use?
Robert: No. Actually, I did not.
Jeremy: Probably no, but I read an article on home improvement and it said –
Robert: Zillow told me that I could get a $15,000 return if I remodeled my bathroom.
Jeremy: Right. So the reality is buyers will always, yeah, buyers will always determine the value. So as we walk through this. What you paid. If you paid for your home an exorbitant amount in 2005, understand that values fell in Washington County 46% since 2005, 2006, and they have come back, that was between 2006 and 11, and they have come back 42%.
Robert: Overall.
Jeremy: Overall. So we have almost gained back every bit of what we lost. But do you realize it took us five years to lose it and another almost six years to get it back? Almost seven years to get it back. So if you followed that, in 2005, values were really high. In 2011, values were really low. In 2018, values are really high, and now it is 2019. Where can we only predict that values can realistically be in the next few years? Not higher.
Robert: Or, if so, we had to weather going down to come back up eventually.
Jeremy: Right. So for our home sellers right now, what I want to articulate is there are six pricing misconceptions and when you put your home on the market at a price well, I paid this, well I need this, well I want this, well my neighbor said this, well an agent told me, well do you know what it would cost me to rebuild this day? None of it has any bearing on what your home is worth. What your home will be worth is what a reasonable buyer with funds available and the initiative to move into your home will pay in today’s market. And what I am trying to, want to make sure that we convey is that even though, even though right now, Robert, a whole bunch of your clients, my clients, in the area are frustrated saying but I thought I could sell for blank. They need to understand that the price that they need to be at, which is probably 5% lower is an amazing price.
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: Is an amazing price.
Robert: It is all perspective. It is all about perspective.
Jeremy: If someone had told them in 2011, if someone had told these people in 2011 when I was selling Hidden Valley townhomes for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and HUD, government foreclosures for $85,000 –
Robert: Wow.
Jeremy: What is Hidden Valley at right now? 170?
Robert: Maybe a little more.
Jeremy: If someone had told somebody in 2011, hey you know your Hidden Valley townhome that you have to sell for 85 right now? It is going to go back to 170 or 80 thousand dollars, it is going to double in value by 2018. Would have kissed me on my face if they could have had the old almanac. You know the almanac from Back to the Future.
Robert: Back to the Future.
Jeremy: If I could have predicted that, would you have been very happy with me?
Robert: Biff, I would be so happy.
Jeremy: I know you would. So it is all perspective. So even though, and the most important two words of today’s show are even though. Even though you feel frustrated today that the market will not bring quite what you want, you need to realize that the market is bringing you the, this is one of the highest price points in the history of American housing today. And what is going to have to happen is this. You are going to have to amend that price mostly as folks are. And here is the challenge. Robert, if I know you are a baseball player, and a few other sports.
Robert: Go Yankees.
Jeremy: Yeah, go Yankees. Hand-to-hand combat. I actually watched you do hand-to-hand combat that day with Creed. When the ball –
Robert: I won.
Jeremy: Yeah, when the ball, you kind of did. When the ball goes away from the field and it is rolling down a slope away from you, what is the only way to get to the ball?
Robert: You have to get in front of it.
Jeremy: Yes. So, folks, envision. You are a kid. You are chasing a ball. It is rolling down a hill, and you are lunging. Right? You are lunging.
Robert: Trying to stand. Keep standing. Try not to fall.
Jeremy: Tearing your hip flexor. The only way to stop the ball is to get in front. And so, if folks want to actually capture the highest price for their home it is important that they get in front of the ball and not be chasing the ball. And right now, we have sellers who are chasing the ball. And in six months, they are going to look back and say what?
Robert: Man, I probably just should have just made the move six months ago.
Jeremy: Yeah. But I was so convinced that I needed that extra 5%. Right? Why is it impossible to underprice a home?
Robert: Well, I think there are a couple of reasons, but the main reason why is because one you hit that price where all of the buyers know that truly there is value, because it is value. It is just like going down the street and hey milk is $3 a gallon at Smith’s –
Jeremy: Got it.
Robert: — and it is $3.50 at Albertson’s, I will drive across town to save that fifty cents. Right? I will do whatever it takes to get the cheaper value or the value I see that is actually there. So if I price it to a spot to where I know multiple buyers are in it, I am not going to wait. I am going to worry about the fact that somebody else is going to get it if I do not, and so I am going to pay 100% of what they are asking because I do not want to lose it.
Jeremy: Do you think this is true even for the luxury, the high-end market? Let’s talk to our luxury listeners right now.
Robert: Oh, absolutely. I think the luxury in this, specifically in this town, our high-end clients, the people that own second homes here or have retired here and put their nest egg in a beautiful home because we get probably some of the most amazing homes for the best value in my opinion.
Jeremy: We sure do.
Robert: In this town.
Jeremy: We sure do. We have folks come out of California and go wait a minute. $1 million for this? This was three back home.
Robert: Exactly. It is unbelievable. The biggest mistake I see happen is realtors tell them it is worth more than it really is, and the list to sales price of luxury homes is significantly different than it is even at the six, five and six hundred thousand. At 500,000, they are getting 99.9% of their asking price. At a million dollars, they are getting 92% of their asking price.
Jeremy: Good grief. You sold, okay, this is fun, I looked at this. You sold the most expensive home in Bloomington. It is the highest sale I have seen in five years. What was the sales price?
Robert: $1,070,000.
Jeremy: Okay. 1.070. Okay?
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: $1,070,000 on Jolly Circle.
Robert: Beautiful house by the way.
Jeremy: Yeah, there was some marketing that was done.
Robert: Absolutely.
Jeremy: We shot this killer –
Robert: Sweet video.
Jeremy: This video and –
Robert: We are going to put it out on Facebook.
Jeremy: Yeah, we will link it up for you. Incredible video. A guy hitting a golf ball, it is actually me, but you cannot really tell it is me unless you know it is me.
Robert: You shanked it. It actually was not even that good of a hit.
Jeremy: I actually hit it right on the green, I think. But we shot this incredible video, and there was some marketing that had to be created for this home. But no amount of marketing –
Robert: Nothing.
Jeremy: Nothing would have changed the value of that hope.
Robert: Nope.
Jeremy: But Jeremy, wait a minute. You mean that marketing does not matter? Oh I did not say it did not matter. Marketing is actually, in a lot of ways, a defensive measure. It is a protective measure to ensure that you get all of the value out of your home.
Robert: Right.
Jeremy: But buyers will not pay you more than the value. They do not say you know that video that you guys shot? That was incredible, and I am a really smart buyer that has enough money to spend a million dollars for a home. I think I will pay you an extra hundred grand because the video was so impressive.
Robert: Yeah, I was just blown away.
Jeremy: The video, right, the video was to make sure that we got them all their value. It is impossible to under price your home because if you price your home even quote below market you will have multiple buyers bid against and raise the price. Downtown St. George, Putnam’s home, you sold it for twenty grand over the asking price?
Robert: Twenty grand over asking.
Jeremy: $20,000 over the asking price because buyers bid against each other.
Robert: And in downtown St. George, they are selling for what the value is.
Jeremy: They are. Bingo.
Robert: They are not selling for an inflated value. They are just selling for what they are worth.
Jeremy: Thanks, Robert. Hey, let’s go sell some real estate today.
Robert: Hey, why not?
Jeremy: Let’s do that.
Mike: You have been listening to the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive. For more information, call 275-1690 or online find them at Sold in St. George dot com.


St. George Economic Summit 2019 Recap with Jeriah Threlfall (St. George Real Estate Radio Show)

Click on Facebook Live. to see the entire recorded show from Facebook! Below is the actual S. George Real Estate Morning Drive show, hosted by St. George Real Estate Agent Jeremy Larkin, word for word! Enjoy and please share if you find it valuable! 

Jeremy Larkin and The Larkin Group @ Keller Williams Realty can be reached by calling 435-767-9821, or emailing sales@gostgeorge.com. 

Mike: KDXU news time. It is 8:35. Good morning and welcome. Southern Utah morning news. Your time once again for another look at the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive as we check in wit the voice of St. George Real Estate Jeremy Larkin.
Jeremy: Good morning, and I hope you are driving, all of you out there driving somewhere important. What time did you all get up this morning, guys? Chantry, I want to know about you. 4:30? Mike, that mic is not live and I just said Mike twice. I love it.
Chantry: How about now?
Jeremy: Mike, we have been talking about the mic. And Mike says the mic is live. All right. Love it. 4:30.
Chantry: 4:30.
Jeremy: Ouch.
Chantry: I know. Everyday. I cannot help it.
Jeremy: What time do you go to bed?
Chantry: Early. Like I am in bed by nine.
Jeremy: Okay, Mike, when did you get up? I want to know. He is not on the mic, but he is going to tell us. How early was it, Michael?
Michael: 4:45.
Jeremy: 4:45. He got up in 15 minutes, Jeriah. What have you got?
Jeriah: I cannot compete with that. Six o’clock.
Jeremy: Yeah, you know what? 6:30 for me. I have got Andy. Andy is the new guy in the studio today. We do not even have him on. Andy, when did you get up? Like seven. He was five. Okay. So he did not roll in here. Jeremy Larkin here. We have got the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive. I thought we should find out when everyone got out of bed this morning. Actually, the problem is I was not asleep, so I spent much of the last two hours of the morning thinking about, you know the psychology?
Chantry: Yep.
Jeremy: I should go to sleep. What is going on?
Chantry: Stressed yourself out. Yeah.
Jeremy: I do not know what is happening. Something must be weird. I do not know. Is the house going to cave in? Is my kid alive? This is the stuff that goes through your head. Right? Finally, at 6:30 I said maybe I should just get myself up, and that would help it. Jeremy Larkin, host of the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive. The voice of St. George Real Estate. Happy to be with you all this morning. It is raining, and it needs to be raining, by the way. We are in St. George, Utah, and if it does not rain and it does not snow for everyone who is bellyaching this morning, I am going to tell you something. There is not going to be any economic development because they are dry.
Andy: Yeah, water is a big thing. We need it for sure.
Jeremy: It is huge deal. So I have some friends, close friends and family, oh the rain. This is just the worst thing. You have to realize that in late January or February, and typically during the Parade of Homes –
Chantry: I was going to say it is going to wait until the parade, doesn’t it?
Jeremy: Typically, during the Parade of Homes it is going to rain for three straight days, but these are these soaking rains that give us the moisture that we need to run this community. So we are happy to do it. Today is January 17, 2019. I do not know how many times you all put 2018 so far on whatever your putting dates on, but I have definitely had a couple.
Chantry: Oh yeah, lots of times.
Jeremy: Well, yeah, you are doing mortgages. I have got Chantry Abbott here who is one of my very close friends and just an absolute amazing home mortgage lender. Someone who, he and his team, Steven Stout and the people at Guild Mortgage, they help people get the money they need so they can buy a home. And I have been having such fun discussions with my kids lately, my 12 and 13-year old. Because they will be like, Dad, how do you buy a house? What a great question. Dad, you do not have $300,000 laying around, do you? Well, no I do not. And then I get to talk about –
Chantry: That is cool.
Jeremy: Right.
Chantry: I have not done it for a while, but even a handful of years ago I had a college professor that taught finance. I would go teach him about credit even at the college level. That was kind of fun.
Jeremy: Oh yeah, it is. Right?
Chantry: Even now, adults do not have a clue yet still. Unless you have bought one, there is just no way to know.
Jeremy: There is no way to have any real kind of concept of that. So I have this conversation with my boys. Well, no, most people, some do, what percentage of deals are cash right now?
Chantry: I have heard like 40%. It is a lot.
Jeremy: It is a lot.
Chantry: We are always higher. The national average is probably more like 25.
Jeremy: It is a lot of cash deals, man.
Chantry: Southern Utah has always been high, right. Just because it is a big retirement, selling homes in California, it has always been a high cash market.
Jeremy: Right. Right because, and Jeriah says he is surprised. And if you think about this for a minute, gang, and we are going to introduce him better momentarily. A lot of these folks they have a home. Regular people, ooops, I knocked that right off. Regular people have a home in California. A regular home. Like regular folk, as they say. They buy a house for $250,000, $450,000. It now appreciates to $850 or a million and they go to sell it. They have been paying the mortgage down for 15 years.
Chantry: Yep.
Jeremy: And they show up in St. George with $500,000 in their hands. Right?
Chantry: Yeah.
Jeremy: And they look, it is different than you think. And they look really rich. Like man, these rich buyers from California. A lot of these people are regular people just like me and us and our listeners. These are not people who are so independently wealthy. They are just folks who bought at the right time, they held real estate. We have been talking on this show for five years that it is such an incredibly better decision. Chantry, you probably heard us talk about, maybe you have been on here, the average net worth of a homeowner over 60 years old, over 64 years old is $300,000, and the average net worth of a renter over 64 years old is five grand.
Chantry: Wow.
Jeremy: That is what Keeping Current Matters put out.
Chantry: When you speak about the average, a lot the California people –
Jeremy: There is no net worth.
Chantry: The average buyer typically what we see is they are retired on a pension. We get a lot of firefighter, retired policemen, school teachers, five grand a month pensions, not very good in Southern California, but here it is pretty good. They can do well.
Jeremy: Yeah, you are not doing anything in Southern California.
Chantry: So that is what happens is –
Jeremy: That is your property taxes.
Chantry: — they have to change.
Jeremy: So I have got Chantry Abbott here with Guild Mortgage. We have got Jeriah Threlfall. I love saying your name, and everybody does. I got up this morning and I just said it a lot of times so it could be easy. He is with St. George Economic Development. Do we call it the Economic Development Council anymore?
Jeriah: Yeah, sometimes we do. Economic Council office. Anything works.
Jeremy: I am going to put into my English, and I am going to let him correct me. But these guys work with really pushing healthy growth for St. George, and what we are talking about is economic development. Right? Bringing businesses in, especially value-added businesses. I am going to have define that momentarily for our listeners.
Jeriah: Okay.
Jeremy: And the reason I speak with fluency, right, because, you might remember, but my first career was with Gilbert Jennings and Larry Gardner. That was my first real career doing Fort Pierce Industrial Park. I got a lot of experience at the time. Scott Hershey. But these guys are looking to bring commerce to Washington County, jobs to where we live. So define value added, Jeriah, for us. What a value-added business is.
Jeriah: To keep it simple, historically, we have always looked for people that make something in our area and then it sell it to someone outside of our area.
Jeremy: Beautiful.
Jeriah: Just a really dumb-downed version of value added. We try to look for people who are not competing with established businesses in the area, and then recently, we have expanded as well. We are also looking for professional. We are having some good success going and recruiting, for example, like small engineering firms out of California.
Jeremy: Cool.
Jeriah: Need a place to relocate. It is interesting you were talking about a pension. Five thousand a month pension does not do as much for you in California as it does here. We have got companies where their engineers are making $160,000 a year –
Jeremy: Good grief.
Jeriah: — and they cannot buy a house.
Jeremy: Yeah.
Jeriah: And they live four hours from the coast. It is not, they are not trying to buy a beach house.
Jeremy: Yeah, they are not on the water.
Jeriah: They are in a climate that is almost exactly like ours. Kind of a high desert. They cannot afford. The older, the people who have been at the company 20 years or so, they have their houses. They are okay. But the people coming out of college, unless the husband and the wife are engineers, they cannot buy a house at $160,000 a year.
Jeremy: Is that wild, Chantry?
Chantry: That is wild. Yeah. How many people in St. George do I meet that are making $160,000 a year? That is very few.
Jeremy: How many? How many a year? What percentage?
Chantry: A handful. Less than 1%.
Jeremy: Less than 1% that come through your mortgage office are making 160. Combined incomes.
Chantry: Yeah, probably combined household. Yeah.
Jeriah: Yeah, one of the companies that we have been working with is in Paso Robles. I think their median home price is like 675.
Jeremy: Yeah.
Chantry: So 675, what would you say ours is?
Jeremy: 300.
Chantry: 300. So yeah, more than double.
Jeremy: They might see 330 but 300 realistically. Because the median is the middle. Right? And Jeriah makes a great comment here about value-added companies. So for instance, Olive Garden is not a value-added company. Right? Because it is almost like to tell people, show people what it is not.
Jeriah: Right.
Jeremy: Talk to me about a company that is coming to St. George. Let’s talk about the economic summit from a week ago and then we can put this in perspective.
Jeriah: People who are coming right now? We have got a lot of people we are working with that we are still under confidentiality agreements with.
Jeremy: Okay, what type of business?
Jeriah: If you look at someone who presented at the summit was Ram, the Ram Company.
Jeremy: Okay.
Jeriah: Textbook. They are value added. They make their solenoids and their aircraft parts and all these things and they sell them all over the world. So they are taking money from other local economies and bringing it in to our economy.
Jeremy: Versus coming in and saying well, we are competing with all the other companies locally. They are really not.
Chantry: So value added, let me understand that one more time. They do not compete with somebody local.
Jeriah: They can and still be value added. We try. We are not going to go recruit someone who does the same thing Ram does.
Chantry: Ideally, not competitive, but (indiscernible)
Jeriah: For us. Yeah.
Chantry: But the main thing is they are exporting outside of our area, so they are bringing money into Washington County that Washington County is not paying for.
Jeriah: Fresh dollars.
Jeremy: Yeah.
Chantry: Wow. That is cool. I love that, too.
Jeremy: I love that. Fresh dollars. That is a good way to say it.
Chantry: I have known Jeriah for years. I have been to the Economic Summit for years.
Jeremy: You did his mortgage loan. Right?
Chantry: Yeah.
Jeremy: He did. Yeah.
Chantry: And we get this all the time. I get this all the time.
Jeremy: Even Jeriah had to borrow money to buy a house.
Jeriah: Just a little bit of it.
Chantry: People always say I wish St. George would get some jobs. It is like it is not lack of effort. It is just probably a long road.
Jeriah: It is.
Jeremy: Sure.
Jeriah: It is, and it is interesting that when the economy is down people are nervous to make a move because they are like things are down right now. And right now, we are facing the battle that the economy has been good for so long that people are afraid it is going to go down. And so, time is huge. We have got companies that have relocated to the area. Most of them have made initial contacts with us two years before. Sometimes you get a really quick one on a smaller-sized business, but we have got 13 projects in our pipeline right now.
Jeremy: Whew.
Chantry: What do you guys do to help the company?
Jeriah: It depends on how sophisticated they are on their own end. If they are a bigger company, they will have their own, like Family Dollar that just recently came here. They have their own site selection team. So, we help them. We make connections for them. We help line up state incentives, local incentives, anything we can do to help.
Chantry: So some of these companies can get state government incentives or local –
Jeriah: Right.
Chantry: — money to help them come here.
Jeremy: And this is kind of cool. I am just throwing a thought in here. So, Family Dollar comes to down. Do you remember what they spent on that land? I am trying to remember. It was a ton.
Jeriah: It was a lot. It was right before my time, but it was a lot.
Jeremy: It was. So they come into town. They buy the land, which pumps tons of money in the economy.
Chantry: Yeah, think about how much that cost you.
Jeremy: They built this massive facility, which pumps tons of money into the economy. They create jobs. Right? Which is creating jobs. Then the facility is now using, has usage, uses things. It uses power, and of course, one of the number one reasons that these companies go to Fort Pierce is, Jeriah, drum roll, please.
Jeriah: Cheap power.
Jeremy: Cheap power.
Jeriah: Very reliable. Very good power.
Jeremy: Cheapest or second cheapest power grid. Was that what I remember?
Jeriah: In the nation. Yeah.
Jeremy: In the nation. Is that crazy, Chant? Dixie Escalante.
Chantry: So that is a big reason that they are coming.
Jeremy: Huge reason, man.
Jeriah: We are working with a company right now that is in Southern California. On this on, southern California helped us by taking their building for eminent domain.
Jeremy: They kicked them out.
Jeriah: So they are in a building they do not like right now. But yeah, just what we can safe them in power will cover the lease on a building here.
Jeremy: Could you imagine? Think about that. Just what they save in power, and that is Dixie Escalante right out there on Brigham Road in Bloomington.
Chantry: So I am just a mortgage guy. That is all I have done my whole life. I do not know any of this stuff. That is really interesting, I think, for the average person that is not involved in the development to think that the county is actually trying to give money, finding ways, grants, to bring these businesses. It is a tiny, tiny investment for the return the county is going to get probably.
Jeremy: Correct.
Jeriah: The way I think about it is 90% or more of all incentives that are given are actually just a return on the property tax that they are going to pay. So you take a vacant piece of land and whoever owns it is paying $2000 a year on property taxes. Making up easy numbers.
Chantry: Because they are just being taxed on the value of the land –
Jeriah: Right.
Chantry: — which is not a lot.
Jeriah: Then you go throw a million-square-foot building for Family Dollar –
Jeremy: A million square –
Jeriah: — and all of it that entails and all of their equipment and everything, and now, they are not only paying $2000 in property tax. Maybe they are paying $100,000. So the incentive actually isn’t cash typically out of anyone’s pocket. They pay that property tax and say we, however it gets approved. I think each project, depending on the jobs they bring it and everything—
Jeremy: Right.
Jeriah: They may get 20% of that property tax back for the first five years. So it is not even new money. It is not taking –
Chantry: That is crazy.
Jeriah: — money out of our coffers, so to speak.
Chantry: The crazy part is we are making our money back on the property taxes. You did not even mention that. You mentioned jobs and employment –
Jeremy: Yeah, property taxes.
Chantry: — and building the building and all those other cool things that go along with it.
Jeriah: The companies that, I say we, Scott was here forever.
Jeremy: Sure.
Jeriah: For those that know Scott Hershey. He was here for 20, 21 years before I came in when he retired. The companies that our office has brought in over the last 25 years, the property tax, we went through just for fun once and added it all up, and then allocated it out. And for example, just those companies that we helped, let alone all the rest, contribute about $750,000 a year to the school in property taxes.
Chantry: And all property taxes are county-driven, right? Each city gets a little click, but you are mostly talking about the county?
Jeriah: Yeah, so the county gets, say out of this, I cannot remember the numbers. I should have brought them. Say it is a million dollars, just for easy, that these companies that we brought in pay in property tax per year. The county would get about $20,000 of that. Most of those companies are located in St. George, so they would get about $75,000 say. The school district, the library, the mosquito abatement gets like $2000 a year. All the different tax amenities, the water conservatory district gets some. Any taxing entity gets their portion –
Chantry: Very cool.
Jeriah: — and that is all set by, that is all pre-set.
Jeremy: Right.
Jeriah: When you look at your, when you get your property tax bill, you can go and look at the same thing. It says right on it what percentages, what multiplier, how much goes to the school district, how much goes to the –
Chantry: Jeriah is the monopoly man on a county level.
Jeremy: He is. He actually is. Utahopoly or whatever it is. You guys, I am going to ask both of you. So Jeriah is with, of course, St. George Economic Development. Chantry Abbott is a great lender here in town, and Chantry was at the economic summit last week. I was not. I was here. So give me the highlights. What do you feel like the highlights were? And Chantry, speak up, too, because you attended.
Jeriah: For me, the highlight was all the technology worked and there were no glitches because that is what I sit there and worry about the whole time. If the mics quit working or everyone has videos. It just stresses me out.
Jeremy: How many people attended, by the way?
Jeriah: About 900.
Jeremy: So you have got 1000 people almost. All of them on their phones. All of them on the free wi-fi.
Jeriah: Yes, we have issues before but the Dixie Center has upgraded and it went flawlessly this year as far as the technology goes. But I really felt like the keynote speaker in the morning, Shawn Nelson, the CEO of Lovesac –
Jeremy: Lovesac.
Jeriah: — just absolutely killed it.
Chantry: He nailed it, man. It was awesome. I loved it. He was my favorite part, too.
Jeremy: People said he was great.
Chantry: He is just very like super down-to-earth guy. Even kind of had some funny photos. You know the 10-year challenge that is going around right now?
Jeremy: Yes.
Chantry: Before the 10-year challenge last week, he had like three photos of him of when he was on, in fact, he was on a show with Richard Branson.
Jeriah: Yeah, the rebel billionaire.
Chantry: And he actually –
Jeriah: — with the bad hair. He kept saying –
Chantry: He wore it and had like, I want to describe whose hair, but I, it is like bleached, really long, like down to his shoulders, kind of a chubby-faced looking 20-year-old basically when he started this thing. It was cool.
Jeremy: Oh man. Boy-band hair.
Chantry: Yeah, and he is just making fun of himself, just really easy going.
Jeremy: Who are we talking to? It is his brother-in-law. Who are we talking to this week?
Chantry: Jeremy Back.
Jeremy: Jeremy Back. Thank you. It is Jeremy Back’s brother-in-law. Jeremy Back is my, really the only other Jeremy really in real estate right now, and the CEO of our brokerage.
Jeriah: Okay.
Jeremy: It is his brother-in-law. Classic. Okay, so Shawn Nelson was awesome with Lovesac.
Jeriah: Yeah, he really was amazing.
Jeremy: What is a takeaway from him?
Jeriah: His message is incredible as far as the sustainability of their business model. But the thing that I got the most I went home and told my kids that are little, inspiring entrepreneurs is that he never gave up. His first order was for 12,000 lovesacs, and he did not have a way to make them. So he went and got an agricultural loan and bought a tractor and a haybuster and used that to shred foam. So he got a USDA agricultural loan, drove it to downtown Salt Lake, parked his tractor outside the building, ran a pole in so he could turn the haybuster and shredded foam to make this order.
Jeremy: This is so good, man.
Jeriah: He had to put a ticket to Shanghai, China on his credit card so he could go order the fabric.
Jeremy: Right.
Jeriah: He did not know he could speak Mandarin Chinese thanks to his mission.
Jeremy: Yeah.
Jeriah: So he was able to negotiate better than the average 20-year old.
Jeremy: Oh heavens.
Jeriah: It was incredible.
Jeremy: This is good.
Jeriah: It was a great story.
Chantry: Same thing and then I think the order wanted, the first company wanted a $60,000 deposit, which he did not have $600.
Jeriah: Right.
Chantry: For the order. Right?
Jeriah: To the factory, the Chinese factories.
Chantry: He said well I am Lovesac, and I have never had to pay a deposit.
Jeremy: He put it out there.
Chantry: And they thought wait a minute. So they gave him the money because he just acted like he had it figured out.
Jeriah: The factory needed 60,000, so then he called the people who placed the order and he said yeah, I need the 60,000 deposit. They are like we do not do deposits. He is like well we have never done one without a deposit.
Chantry: I am Lovesac. I have never done a deal without a deposit. Which is true because he had never done a deal.
Jeremy: This is pretty funny.
Jeriah: He kept saying we are the best not beanbag company in the world. It was like him and his cousin.
Jeremy: Wow. I have to tell you that it is super helpful to me just a couple of thoughts you just shared there.
Chantry: And the journey he went through I think was the point Jeriah was making. Knowing how hard it was, would you start over and do it again? I do not know. It was, was it 20 years in the making and he has had a lot of, he has failed a lot of times and had a few really crazy successful moments.
Jeriah: Yeah, he showed pictures of the Lovesac Limo and then the restructuring and then the ups and downs. But the thing that I kind of relate everything to my kids and how interested they are in things. And the thing that I told them that I was really impressed with is that he had an idea and he got off the couch and did it. And that is his slogan is get off the couch, and it makes sense because get off the couch and onto a Lovesac, but it is also a life creed. How many 18-year-old kids, he tells it he was just sitting around eating a bowl of Captain Crunch like a week after school, and he was like how cool would it be if I had a beanbag that was as big as from me to the TV? And then he was like I am going to get in the car and go to Joann Fabrics and make a big beanbag.
Jeremy: We are going to do it.
Jeriah: And now he is the CEO of a publicly-traded company based off getting off the couch for that one good idea.
Jeremy: Yeah, a northern Utah kid.
Jeriah: Yep.
Jeremy: Born and raised in Utah at the risk of the risk. A Mormon kid. Right? They are not Mormons anymore. It is the Church of Jesus Christ, but truly a local kid. Not Richard Branson. Right? Not Bill Gates. Not Seth Godin, one of the great thought leaders that we follow. Because it is always somebody else. But what he is saying well, not really. Why does it have to be somebody else?
Jeriah: Yep.
Jeremy: Why can’t it just be anybody right off the couch right here? So what other highlights from the summit?
Jeriah: That was my favorite. Do you have anything you want to say?
Chantry: How many people normally do you have? It seemed, I have been to a few and it seemed sold out. It was awesome. A great turn out.
Jeriah: Yeah, we have been growing. We sold about 70 more tickets this year than we did last year. We are about the maximum.
Jeremy: You almost sold me one. Well, Dixie State D1. I do not want to miss that.
Chantry: Yeah, that is cool.
Jeremy: Dixie State announced they are Division 1. It was pretty cool this morning on my way, I live right downtown, Jeriah, close to our office. I am by Town Square, so I take a kid to Tonaquint and then I take a kid to Dixie Middle, and then I come back up to the show. It was fun to see the one up here with the light where the D was not lit up and then you could see the one was completely temporary.
Jeriah: Yeah, it was pretty exciting.
Jeremy: Right. So Dixie State is going Division 1, which, what does it really mean for the university and the town? In a simple overview. Better athletic opportunities, of course, and athletics in college is money to the college.
Jeriah: For me, and I do not speak for the whole university or town or anything obviously, but for me, I think it validates it. There is no higher level –
Jeremy: Right.
Jeriah: — and so we all have believed in Dixie State University clear back when it was the high school, the junior college, the everything in between. The thing that I am excited is to be able to watch them compete against the top level in sports or anything else.
Jeremy: Right, and just for fun, Division 1, just because I know a lot of out, I know you are a sports fan, but a lot of listeners would not know this. So to give you perspective, when we are talking about Division 1, here are your top five ranked football teams – Alabama, Clemson, Notre Dame, Oklahoma, Georgia. That is Division 1.
Jeriah: Right.
Jeremy: So even the non-sports fans are like oh, that is Division –
Chantry: We are one of those.
Jeremy: — yeah.
Chantry: Dixie is one of those now.
Jeremy: We are going to get killed in the short-term at sports.
Jeriah: At first. Well, the nice thing, I was at, they announced that on Friday at the university and they had all the student athletes come.
Jeremy: Cool.
Jeriah: And I was just standing there waiting to talk to somebody, and I heard a couple of the athletes talking about now they are Division 1 athletes and just the pride that they felt in that, that they get to compete at that level for the next four years.
Chantry: That is a good point because if you are high school kid, you want to be able to say hey I went D1. It is top, top level. That is cool.
Jeriah: Yep. I think it is a great thing. It is a great opportunity for all of the students. It is a great opportunity for our town. For me in economic development, it is huge too because anything you can do to get outreach and get some notoriety, and people ask questions like that. It is not, the number one concern is is my business going to be profitable? Can I succeed there? But then right away, they typically go to the university and the culture that it brings.
Jeremy: Yep.
Jeriah: That is where you are going to get most of your plays and your concerts and your sporting events and all of these things and being Division 1 is going to be a good thing for us.
Chantry: So what Division 1 schools are there in the state? BYU? Utah? Weaver? Logan?
Jeriah: Yep. SSU.
Chantry: SSU is D1. And then Dixie.
Jeriah: Utah Valley.
Chantry: They are D1 as well?
Jeriah: Yeah, so we will be in their conference now. And that is the amazing thing is when this started being talked about, we –
Jeremy: Ten seconds.
Jeriah: Because no one thought we could get into a conference and we got –
Chantry: How cool.
Jeremy: By the way, I was a Dixie State graduate when it was a two-year college.
Chantry: Same here.
Jeremy: Got my associate’s degree. You got your associate’s degree.
Chantry: Yep.
Jeremy: Jeriah Threlfall, thank you, man.
Chantry: So cool.
Jeremy: Chantry Abbott, thanks for being in here. Folks, Mike is going to give you some contact information if you have got real estate questions. We will help you in 2019. Thank you.
Mike: Thanks for joining us. If you would like to know more about St. George Real Estate, give them a call at 275-1690 or Sold in St. George dot com.


Record St. George Winter Home Sales


Here’s a 1 minute clip of Jeremy having some fun recording winter home selling spots at Cherry Creek Radio!

WOULD YOU LIKE TO GET YOUR HOME SOLD THIS HOLIDAY AND WINTER SEASON? OR HAS IT ALREADY BEEN ON THE MARKET FOR MONTHS, MAYBE YEARS, AND YOU’D LIKE TO ACTUALLY GET IT MOVED?  I MEAN EVERYONE KNOWS HOMES DON’T SELL DURING THE WINTER, RIGHT? AND THEY DIAL BACK THEIR HOME MARKETING ACCORDINGLY! HEY FOLKS, JEREMY LARKIN HERE WITH THE LARKIN GROUP AT KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY WHERE WE LEARNED YEARS AGO TO DO THE EXACT OPPOSITE! CRANKING UP THE MARKETING DOLLARS OVER THE HOLIDAYS WE HELPED A RECORD FIFTY ONE FAMILIES TAKE ADVANTAGE OF LOW WINTER COMPETITION AND BUY AND SELL HOMES LAST HOLIDAY SEASON. THAT’S FOUR TIMES AS MANY HOMES IN JUST THE WINTER AS THE AVERAGE AGENT SELLS IN AN ENTIRE YEAR! WITH OUR HOME ACCELRATOR PROGRAM WE CAN ALSO GIVE YOU AN INSTANT CASH OFFER ALONG WHEN YOU CALL US, ALLOWING YOU TO PICK THE CLOSING DATE! IF YOU’D LIKE TO ENJOY THE SAME STRATEGIES THAT WE USED TO HELP FAMILIES LIKE THE BECKS, HUBERS, BAUERS, AND HUNDREDS MORE SELL IN AN AVERAGE OF THIRTY SIX DAYS AND FOR ONE HUNDRED PERCENT OF THEIR ASKING PRICE, VISIT ME, JEREMY LARKIN, AND THE LARKIN GROUP AT SOLD IN SAINT GEORGE DOT COM. THAT’S SOLD IN SAINT GEORGE DOT COM, AND START PACKING!

Title: 36% St. George Home Price Appreciation? (St. George Real Estate Morning Drive Show)

Click on Facebook Live. to see the entire recorded show from Facebook! Below is the actual S. George Real Estate Morning Drive show, hosted by St. George Real Estate Agent Jeremy Larkin, word for word! Enjoy and please share if you find it valuable! 

Jeremy Larkin and The Larkin Group @ Keller Williams Realty can be reached by calling 435-767-9821, or emailing sales@gostgeorge.com. 

Mike: KDXU news time. It is 8:36. Good morning and welcome. It is a Thursday, tenth day of the month of January. It is time for the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive with the voice of St. George Real Estate Jeremy Larkin.
Jeremy: Good morning. Good morning. And if you happen to be, let’s see, where could it be afternoon? Europe, Mike?
Mike: I am sure.
Jeremy: I was doing the math. I am like okay, in New York City it is still morning. Listen, if you are somewhere in the mid-Atlantic Ocean, good afternoon. If you are somewhere in Europe, good late afternoon. If you are in Asia, it is nighttime. Right? And then I’m going to come all the way around.
Mike: Yeah, it is another day over there.
Jeremy: So anyway, welcome to the world geographic and weather program where we tell you all sorts of fun facts about time zone you are in. Good morning to our Facebook Live, YouTube Live, now this is really fun. Now, Jesse, when we put on the YouTube Live, did we make it public?
Jesse: I do not know.
Jeremy: That is what we do not know. You might want to check on that. Just so everybody knows, we now broadcast the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive live on YouTube and Facebook simultaneously. It is classic. It is classic. As a matter of fact, I will get a photo of this right now. Jeremy Larkin here, host of the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive. So happy to be with you. I have got my good friend and cohort, business partner, Jesse Poll –
Jesse: Good morning.
Jeremy: — looking very sharp in his suit coat. I have got Mike McGarry, who is a short-timer here at KDXU radio. Just over here, he is really, he is spinning the tracks.
Mike: That is right. By the way, it is 3:38 in the afternoon in London.
Jeremy: Thank you.
Mike: Just doing it for you.
Jeremy: So it is eight hours, right?
Mike: Yeah.
Jeremy: Eight hours. Okay. Eight hours. Thank you. Thank you. Okay, give us Singapore. Will you just do one more? What about Singapore? Why am I saying Singapore? It seemed like a place that is far away, and I was looking last night, gang, at the Costco Travel Guide. You know when you are coming out of Costco, there is the travel guide on the wall and I was looking at what time is it, Mike?
Mike: 11:38pm.
Jeremy: 11:38pm in Singapore. So there you go. You did not know that, did you Jesse?
Jesse: I did not.
Jeremy: Yeah, it is kind of fun.
Jesse: I have heard Singapore is a pretty cool place to visit though.
Jeremy: Yeah, it looks really cool, so I was looking at some Costco Travel, and there was Singapore and there was Bora Bora where you can go stay, the bungalows, the over-water bungalows. Now here is why I did know more or less what time it was in Singapore. So for many years at the Larkin Group, for our listeners, you understand that we help people buy and sell real estate here in Washington County. Buy and sell means purchasing a home for their family, selling a home because it is time to move, and of course, work on purchasing a real estate investment property. We have a gal by the name of Charmie Mendoza, this is so fun. So fun. By the way, with her bonus, she is going to help her son buy a laptop. His first laptop.
Jesse: That is really cool.
Jeremy: She is a single mom. She lives in the Philippines. She is right outside of Manila, and we hired her through some friends of ours in Sacramento who run a company where they hire Filipino folks to help real estate agents. Culturally, they are really, really incredible at tasking. Like you give the list of 200 tasks, and whatever it is, they just nail this. Right?
Jesse: Something that will take me 30 minutes, she will do in 5.
Jeremy: In five. Right? So, she has worked for us for four years, four years. She is a single mom in the Philippines. So by the way, it is 11:30, 12pm, probably the same time in the Philippines, right, Mike?
Mike: Yeah.
Jeremy: She has gone to work for us right now. So if I were to message Charmie right now, she is sitting at her desk. Her son has gone to sleep, and she will work for us through the night. So she works nights. She will work all night long, and then her son will get up, and she will send him to school and then she will go to sleep. Just like anyone who works nights. Sometimes I will email her at about 10pm our time. I will sit down and be shooting some emails out, and I have seen her respond because now she is back up. It is afternoon there. Amazing woman, and we did a Christmas bonus for her, and she is going to get a laptop for her kid. Kind of fun.
Jesse: That is cool.
Jeremy: I know you think about real estate as HGTV and what you do is you go and you look at three homes and you go to open houses. Our business is very different from that. It is a very digital business. So when you are hiring a great real estate agent, they are going to have a whole digital backend that you do not have any idea about, and that is what she does for us. She handles a lot of our digital marketing.
Jesse: Speaking of digital business, this report that we were looking at, it is something like in the 80-something percent, I am looking for it right now, of homes find their home or clients find their home on the internet. That is a huge –
Jeremy: I thought it was ninety, I thought it was like 90%. Was I wrong?
Jesse: So let’s see. Newspapers are down to four, less than five percent?
Jeremy: How do people find their homes? Give it to us.
Jesse: Yard signs is about 20% and the rest of them, so about 75% will find their home first on the internet.
Jeremy: Yeah, so to be clear about this, this is the home they purchased. Okay? The home they purchased. Good morning again to our Facebook Live and YouTube Live listeners. So if you want to check it out. I do not even know who is a YouTube Liver, but what YouTube Live is allowing us to do is, more than anything, save the show straight to our YouTube channel, which is YouTube dot com slash, if you would like to look it up, Go St. George TV. Slash Go St. George TV. So what it is allowing us to do is already have the show, when we walk out of here it is done, and it is posted to YouTube, and there is no fuss, no muss. Something like that. I do not know what they say. But with our Facebook Live listeners, if you have got a question, please ask us anything. We are going to talk today about how much you might expect your home value to go up or down. Right? How much will it go up or down, your value in 2019. Amongst many, many other things. Today is the economic summit, the St. George Washington County Economic Summit down at the Convention Center, and I will not be there, which typically for years I have been there. But I have decided, elected that we have got more pressing work. The Economic Summit is really neat, but the challenge is they charge you a hundred bucks to go spend the day there. It is kind of a networking event, but what they do is this is where they talk about all the new business unveilings, who is the big corporation who is going to town and create new jobs. They are going to give a big old massive real estate report. Folks, just so you know. We already have all that information.
Jesse: Right.
Jeremy: I am literally looking at it on my screen right now. So instead of spending $100 and spending 7 hours, we are just going to go ahead and put on a radio show, and then work to help our clients. The Economic Summit is really cool. I do not want to downplay it. But here is the cool part. We will just take the notes and the summary, and we will present it to you. We will have Chantry Abbot from Guild Mortgage here in studio and talk about interest rates and oh my gosh, about the fact that they went down.
Jesse: Isn’t that crazy?
Jeremy: We are actually going to talk about affordability and why it is such an interesting time in real estate, where it is the best time for you to possibly sell in the last decade. People are going to have their minds blown when we show them, when we talk about how much values have gone up and down over the last decade. They are going to be shocked, shocked, and it is such a strange time, where it is the best time to sell and probably still one of the best times to buy.
Jesse: Right.
Jeremy: Because of interest rates. Excuse me, I am getting choked up because it is very emotional to talk about real estate for me, Jesse.
Jesse: You are a pretty emotional guy anyway.
Jeremy: I know I am. So Jesse, did you see the stat that we were looking at yesterday in my office about the appreciation in 2005 of homes in St. George?
Jesse: I did, and I am going from memory here because I just glanced at it. I think it said 39%.
Jeremy: 36.
Jesse: 36. I was close.
Jeremy: Very good. I literally had a piece of paper on my desk, and Jesse looked at it. Folks, I want you to think about this for a minute. Jeremy Larkin, by the way, host of the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive. If you have got questions, comments, happy to hear from you, and we are broadcasting Facebook Live, Facebook dot com slash Jeremy Larkin, and we are on YouTube Live. YouTube dot com, so just look up Jeremy Larkin. YouTube dot com slash Go St. George TV. So 36%, I want you, our listeners to really consider what I am about to tell you. Historic appreciation of homes annualized, how much homes went up in value, is like 5%. Right? Four, 4-5% annually. Okay?
Jesse: And that is a good, stable number.
Jeremy: Like a healthy market.
Jesse: Yeah.
Jeremy: Do you remember the economic meltdown that we had, Jesse, and people are trying to figure out how we ever got there?
Jesse: Yeah.
Jeremy: Home values went up in 2005 36%.
Jesse: That is nuts. In one year?
Jeremy: Correct.
Jesse: Wow.
Jeremy: Basically, they did seven years, seven, eight years realistically, eight years of appreciation in one single calendar year. And then we wonder why in 2007 everything fell apart. Very specifically what was going on in 2005 and 6 and whether you are wondering if we are going to have a bubble. We had what was called Stated Income Loans going on. Stated Income looks just like this. Jesse comes in the office. I am a mortgage lender. I am not a mortgage lender. I just play one on TV. But to be clear, we will pretend I am. He comes in the office. He says I would like to buy a home. Well, what kind of home would you like to buy? I would like to buy a $400,000 home. Great. You will need to earn about $150,000, and here is a form for you to fill out your income. Well, you put on the form that you happen to make $150,000, that you just so happened to make $150,000. People were stating their income. That is called Stated Income. And of course, when a market goes up 36%, and by the way, this was not just St. George. This was all of them.
Jesse: That was nationwide.
Jeremy: It was crazy. Definitely was Nevada, California, Florida, Arizona. Then a lot of fraud started popping up. So we are not in that market, and we are not experiencing a bubble. So 36% appreciation in one year. Now here is what is fascinating. Folks say man, values fell a lot after that and it seems like they have come up a lot. Oh, I will tell you exactly how much they fell. Values fell 46% from 2006 to 2011 in Washington County. 46% they fell. From 2012 to 2018, they have come up 42%. So we fell by 46%. We are back up 42%. We are virtually back to where we were before. And people, but wait a minute. Here is the difference. We did that at about 6% a year.
Jesse: Yeah.
Jeremy: That is the difference.
Jesse: Over a five-year period. Six actually.
Jeremy: Yeah, we did that at about 6% per year. We are in a very healthy real estate market in Washington County. Very, very healthy. But we have clients who are struggling because they are saying man, it seems like my home will not sell at its current price. The reason it is becoming a very healthy market is because buyers finally said we are not going to quite pay those prices. Right? Like this is hang on a minute now. So prices are settling. I did not say there is depreciation, that homes are going down in value. It is simply folks realizing they cannot quite ask what they hoped, and so there is an adjustment going on.
Jesse: Yeah.
Jeremy: So, Jesse, let’s talk about this for a minute. Historic mortgage rates by the decade. Okay? Slide number two, and just so folks know, we are going to share this on our Facebook page today. So when this is done, we will post this in the comments. As a matter of fact, let’s see if it will post into the comments as we speak. Historic interest rates by decade. You got that in front of you?
Jesse: I do not. I am looking for it.
Jeremy: Second slide. Let’s look at this. This is kind of crazy.
Jesse: (Indiscernible)
Jeremy: Well, page, slide three, I guess. 1970s, 1970s. Anyone out there born in the 1970s? I was. I was born in 1975. Interest rates were 8.86%. Do you know what an interest rate is today, listeners? Anybody out there? We are at about four and a half. Four and a half. 4 ½%. 1970s the average interest rate was 8.86%. It was twice as expensive to own a home. Now people say wait, do you mean that homes were twice as expensive? No, I said it was twice as expensive to own it, to pay for it with your mortgage.
Jesse: I think we are looking at different reports.
Jeremy: What is that?
Jeremy: I think I pulled up the wrong report. So I am just going to go with it.
Jeremy: Good. There you go. There you go. We are looking at, gang, interest rates were twice, twice as expensive, twice as high in the 1970s. Twice as high. Okay? Is that crazy? Is that crazy? And by the way, Jesse, we are looking at January 2019.
Jesse: Okay, so I had December.
Jeremy: There you go.
Jesse: I did not see January in there.
Jeremy: It is in there if you pull it up there. Listen. Would someone come on the show and help this guy out? I am just kidding. He is great. He is just pulling up –
Jesse: It is probably the one at the very top.
Jeremy: Yeah, it is the one right in front of you that says 2000, it says January. 1980s. Anyone born in the 1980s?
Jesse: There it is.
Jeremy: Interest rates were 12.7% average. The average interest rate in the 1980s was 12.7%. It was three times as expensive to pay interest on your home –
Jesse: Wow.
Jeremy: — in the 1980s as it is today. In the 1990s, Jesse, where were we at?
Jesse: 8.12.
Jeremy: Twice as expensive to pay for your interest rate. And in the 2000s? Because we are not in the 2000s anymore. We are in the two thousand teens.
Jesse: 6.29.
Jeremy: So 30% more expensive to pay for your interest on your home. If you get nothing else from this show today, nothing else, listen, please listen. I am going to talk to three groups. You ready? I am going to qualify every single listener on this show. All right? If you are an older person, an empty-nester, a retired person and you have adult children who are saying should I buy a home. I think values are kind of high. I do not know. The answer is yes. Most likely yes. We would need to ask a few more questions, and you are going to say Sonny, do you know interest rates were in the 1980s when I went to buy my first home? They were 12.7%. They were actually as high 18. Okay? If you are a middle-aged person saying do I buy a home? Do I move up? I have been wanting to sell my home and move up, but the challenge is I am not sure because if I sell my home, homes are so expensive. The answer is probably yes because remember if you sell your home in a high market, if you buy a home in a high market, that means you sold your home in a high market. So you are trading across, and remember interest rates could be twice this. Could be. They will eventually be back at 8%. It is probably inevitable. If you are young person saying I am not sure I should buy a home. I just want to be flexible. Let me remind you that again, if you had any concept because you cannot, because how could you have a concept. I do not know what it was like to live in the 1950s because I did not. If you could have a true perspective on how cheap it is borrow money to buy a home right now, you would realize that paying your landlord is literally insanity if you do not have to. I said if you do not have to. I am not calling you insane. Are you calling me insane? Right? Jesse, am I right or am I crazy?
Jesse: Well, you are crazy sometimes. But I think you are right.
Jeremy: But I am right. Okay. So year-over-year home prices, this is kind of crazy, values have been up everywhere. Everywhere across the country values have gone up. Real estate values have gone up for the last how many years now, Jess? Six years?
Jesse: Six years, since, they bottomed out in 2011 and started coming back up.
Jeremy: So let’s talk about price changes. Okay?
Jesse: Seven years.
Jeremy: Yeah, seven years. So we look at slide 11 here. People want to know, I asked the question do you want to know how much your home is going to go up in value this year or down in value. Let’s look at 11, 12, 13. Those Jess, right? The mountain region, here is what is really cool. We have data right now. I can tell you how much values have gone up in the Pacific, Mountain, Mountain West, West North Central, East North Central, Mid-Atlantic and the New England states, or I can tell you the South Atlantic. I can keep going. We have all this data. Values in the mountain region, and if you want to know what the Mountain region is go straight down to Arizona and then go straight up to the Canadian border through the inter-mountain West. Values are up 8.9% in 2000, year over year for the last year. 8.9%. What about Utah? Do we have Utah? I think we do.
Jesse: There are two different, I think it is Utah is –
Jeremy: What are we year over year price changes? I am trying to remember if they have it.
Jesse: Year over year is 8.8.
Jeremy: 8.8%. So look at this. We have seen an 8.8% appreciation in Utah over the last year. So we do have that information. The United States, by the way, 5.1%. So we are outpacing, do you know what I mean? We are outpacing it. Now the question is asked isn’t it less affordable right now because values are up? Well, of course, it is less affordable because values are up. Right? And I do not want to interpret for anyone listening to our show today that values, that it has not become less affordable because values are up.
Jesse: Definitely.
Jeremy: Yeah, what we are simply stating is that because interest rates are so stinking low that it will likely be just as affordable to buy a home now, it will actually be more affordable to buy a home now than to buy a home that is reduced by $100,000 at an interest rate that is twice as high.
Jesse: Yeah.
Jeremy: It is just, that is just the way it is.
Jesse: Well, the likelihood that the market will go down by $100,000 is –
Jeremy: That is a low –
Jesse: The economy would have to stop again.
Jeremy: Yeah, that is a very low chance. So every single piece of economic data that we have is pointing to us returning to normal, healthy market levels, which means what are we looking at for price changes? Do we think values are going to go up? What do you think? What are they saying?
Jesse: So what they are saying overall for next year is 4.8 for the country, but in Utah here they are saying 4.7.
Jeremy: 4.7. So that –
Jesse: I think that is true. I think that the momentum that we have right now, it will take more than a little bit to stop.
Jeremy: Who is they? I am going to tell you who they is. This is Freddie Mac. National Association of Realtors. Fannie Mae, a company called Kay Schiller, CoreLogic, I could keep going.
Jesse: There was actually I think 104 different economists or groups that was in the study.
Jeremy: Yeah, yeah. So they went out –
Jesse: It is not just one guy.
Jeremy: They went out and they asked the specialists. There are the specialists and then there is the anyway. They asked the scientists. They asked the economists. They asked any and everybody who is a player in studying this information what do you think is going to happen to the home values in 2019? And in Washington County they are predicting, excuse me, not Washington County. Utah. Four point?
Jesse: 4.8
Jeremy: 4.8% in the state of Utah for 2019. Now your home. What does that mean? It is hard to say because we, your neighborhood is very, very case specific. And I am going to tell you that if you are selling a home in Stonecliff or Entrada, it is a very different situation.
Jesse: Yeah that is –
Jeremy: Very different situation than if you are selling your home in downtown St. George.
Jesse: Right.
Jeremy: Santa Clara.
Jesse: And we will throw a report that will cover that for Washington County, even for St. George because if you are talking Stonecliff, you are looking at probably about a year to two years of inventory that is for sale. If you are talking downtown St. George, you are looking at less than two months.
Jeremy: What do you mean by a year of inventory though?
Jesse: Well, if no other homes came on the market, it would take a year or two depending on what price point to sell every home that is on the market. Downtown St. George, it is less than two months.
Jeremy: Right.
Jesse: So it is a big difference.
Jeremy: How about that? Right? It would take one to two years, up to two years to go through all of that inventory. Can you imagine if cereal was sitting on a shelf for two years? Now there are a lot of preservatives in cold cereal. Right? But guess what? It would go bad, wouldn’t it? And what Jesse is saying is absolutely right. Downtown St. George, it is one to two months. Here is what that means. In two months, if nobody else put their home on the market, we would be out of homes to sell.
Jesse: We would be out of homes.
Jeremy: Okay, and by the way, we have specific areas. If you are thinking about selling a home, we have folks looking for homes and they cannot find them in this market. We played around last week, and we talked about our $1 Listing Program? Is it real? It is absolutely real.
Jesse: It is real.
Jeremy: So, you can sell a home for as little as a buck. Terms and conditions apply. Yeah, you do need to buy another home through us. And guess what? Well, what if I am not going to buy another home through you? We have a program for that, too.
Jesse: We have a program for you, too.
Jeremy: Which is the Save Up to $10,000 Program. So we are having some fun in the month of January. Save as little as $1250. But here is the deal, Jesse, what is that percentage? What can people hope for this year for appreciation?
Jesse: 4.8.
Jeremy: Yeah, we are going to hope for it. The only we are going to find out is –
Jesse: We will have a debate next January.
Jeremy: The only way we are going to find out is we are going to have to spend the next year.
Jesse: Figure out who is right and who is wrong.
Jeremy: I do not know if he is right. There you go. Thanks gang. Appreciate you watching and listening and share this on your Facebook page if you are watching with your friends. Over and out.

$1 Home Sale Program and GLUT of Homes Hitting The New Year’s Market (St. George Real Estate Morning Drive Show)

If you prefer to view and comment on Facebook vs. the YouTube video above, click here: Facebook Live. 

Below is the actual St. George Real Estate Morning Drive show, hosted by St. George Real Estate Agent Jeremy Larkin, word for word! Enjoy and please share if you find it valuable! 

Jeremy Larkin and The Larkin Group @ Keller Williams Realty can be reached by calling 435-767-9821, or emailing sales@gostgeorge.com. 

Jeremy: Happy New Year. By the way, that was one of my favorite elements of the new year is we were at the grocery store last night at the Winn’s down there in the Washington Fields, and people are so fun. The produce guy was really cool. Theywere having a debate about sauerkraut by the way. I was a cilantro fan –
Jesse: What is there to debate about sauerkraut?
Jeremy: Well, I do not like it.
Jesse: Oh, okay. So that is in debate?
Jeremy: Yeah, it was a debate. Yeah, it was a debate. And then the produce guy started kind of pitching the sauerkraut. He was a great guy. And then as we walked away, he said Happy New year. I love that about the holidays. Happy Holidays and Happy New Year. It is fun.
Jesse: I would like to see it if people could keep that attitude or thought all year round. Why not be happy every day?
Jeremy: Yes, thank you.
Jesse: Well, I have been accused of that.
Jeremy: You do get accused of it, and you resemble the comment, and I will tell you that it is very similar to the whole 9/11. Remember when 9/11 happened –
Jesse: Yes.
Jeremy: Suddenly everyone in the country was fearful believer in God and very patriotic. That lasted about twelve months. But good morning to everyone out there. Jeremy Larkin, host of the St. George Real Estate Morning Drive. I have got multiple co-hosts in here. I have got Jesse Poll from the Larkin Group. Mike McGarry is here.
Jesse: I told Mike this morning we are happy he is back.
Jeremy: Yeah, it is nice to have him here.
Jesse: We do not like it when he is gone.
Mike: I will hang around for a little while.
Jeremy: Yeah, he has just has this thing dialed in. Yeah, I know. He is going to hang around about 30 days.
Mike: Pretty close to that, yeah.
Jeremy: Good morning, David. Love it man. Love it. 343 never forget. Absolutely right, David. Isn’t amazing, by the way, Dave, and Dave is a fireman, and one of my childhood friends. Literally, our families go way back. But this is not a political show. But it was crazy how patriotic and God-fearing we were for about twelve months and –
Jesse: And really how –
Jeremy: Then we were just like ah, we are busy now.
Jesse: And really how the country really came together.
Jeremy: The country came together. I will tell you. Crisis a very, very interesting gift and teacher for us. Is it not, Jesse?
Jesse: It is.
Jeremy: I want to share some New Year’s Resolutions. We ran a little Facebook thing where we said are you believer in New Year’s resolutions. I am going to share my theme for 2018. I think our listeners want to know what my theme is. Don’t you? Does anyone know, please say you do, The Christmas Story? I have it almost memorized, the movie The Christmas Story.
Jesse: We actually did not watch that this year.
Jeremy: It was on TBS and TNT for 24 hours straight. You do not even have to have the DVD, but I do have the DVD. So on the Larkin Group Facebook page, by the way, we will announce our winner this morning.
Jesse: Right on.
Jeremy: Somebody won $50 cash. The $50 cash is sitting –
Jesse: $50.
Jeremy: — on my desk.
Jesse: I saw that sitting on your desk.
Jeremy: Yeah, sitting on my desk.
Jesse: I thought it was for me. A gift.
Jeremy: Sorry, dude. Sorry. Sorry. Sitting on my desk. $50 cash. So I asked the question New Year’s resolutions or no? Chime in. Chime in. And I thought that this was very fun. We will talk about real estate. We are going to talk about selling a home for $1, and what happens every, $1. This is like, you know what you can get for a buck? You can get a drink at McDonald’s.
Jesse: Can you really still?
Jeremy: Oh, all the drinks are 99 cents. You can get some chicken nuggets. You can get a little French fry, a small shake, a parfait. Okay?
Jesse: Okay.
Jeremy: I do not even think you can purchase a pack of gum almost anywhere for 99 cents.
Jesse: I do not think so.
Jeremy: We will talk about that.
Jesse: Very few things can you buy for a dollar.
Jeremy: Yeah, for a buck. We are going to talk about $1 home sale program because we decided to have some fun in January. It is just for fun. But people, this is so interesting to hear what people said. Mark said yes. Natasha said yes, but not so much traditional New Year’s goals. More like intending to improve myself. I have chosen a word for the year. That is mine for the year. Mine is build. Relationships. Build our business. Build each other up. Beautiful. One of our past clients.
Jesse: I like that.
Jeremy: McKennon, did you know your daughter chimed in?
Jesse: Yes.
Jeremy: Yes, absolutely. We never know where we are going, but we always know where we have been, and we need new goals to set new heights to see how far we can get. It is all for naught. Is life even worth living? Right? I said kind of. What I do not like is the resolution because it is usually like a two-week campaign. I like more what she is saying which is we are looking, that idea of build. I love having a word for the year, and I have a theme, which I will share. But for me it is more like the new year is such a gift for new beginnings, and to kind of rethink and say where I have been. We know where we have been, she said. Andrew Young, absolutely yes. Cassie Segmiller, yes. Brett and Natalie Johnson, yes, and on and on. But let’s go ahead and let’s give congratulations to Cassie Segmiller who won the drawing for fifty bucks.
Jesse: Nice.
Jeremy: Yeah. We will respond on Facebook to her today. So here goes, Jess. I do not know how you say it. He is one of the famous, what do you call him, he is Tao. He is a Taoist. He is a Taoist. T-A-O. It is one of my favorite quotes. Watch your thoughts; they become words. Watch your words; they become actions. Watch your actions; they become habits. Watch your habits; they become character. Watch your character; it becomes your destiny. So that is my theme for the year. Rather than a word, it is this idea of monitoring how my thoughts become my words and actions and habits and character and destiny and how much we mess ourselves up.
Jesse: Without even knowing it.
Jeremy: Oh, we do not even know it.
Jesse: This stuff happens so gradually that one day we wake up and realize that somewhere over the last 20 years I have become somebody I do not really want to be.
Jeremy: Yep, yep. So yeah, like the boiling pot of water. So hey, happy January. We are waxing a little philosophical, but guess what? It is our show. We will talk about whatever we want to talk about. Right, Jesse?
Jesse: It is your show. I will just follow along.
Jeremy: It is my show. Good morning. So gang, you need to understand that we actually are now broadcasting. There are, I wish I had my other phone. I would take a picture.
Jesse: Yeah, where is your other piece of technology. You do not have enough here.
Jeremy: I have another phone in my car. There are two phones on the countertop right here in two different tripods. One is broadcasting Facebook Live, and one is broadcasting YouTube Live.
Jesse: Right.
Jeremy: So if anyone ever wanted to know where you could watch this on YouTube Live, I should have put that in the comments. It is YouTube dot com, of course, but it is Go St. George TV. G-O-S-T George TV. We have got about 1300 subscribers there or something, and we have done very little live. So if you want to be on YouTube Live and that is your preference, see our YouTube channel Go St. George TV. G-O-S-T George TV or hang out on Facebook Live, and of course, all of our radio listeners, you are already on with us at 94.9FM, 890AM. Jesse, it is January 3rd, and there is a phenomenon that happens, especially in St. George because the Parade of Homes is six weeks from now.
Jesse: It is coming right up.
Jeremy: What is happening? You brought some data this morning.
Jesse: The data –
Jeremy: Every January.
Jesse – that I brought this morning is peanuts compared to what is coming.
Jeremy: Can I show them?
Jesse: Yep.
Jeremy: Anyone who is looking. This is his data. Three days.
Jesse: During the last –
Jeremy: I hope everyone is looking at this.
Jesse: Hey, every genius scribbles.
Jeremy: It is a 4×7 –
Jesse: Ask Einstein.
Jeremy: — scratch paper. I like it.
Jesse: In the last three days you have had 36 homes hit the market.
Jeremy: Last four days or two days? It is really two days.
Jesse: Two days. Yeah. So since the first. The first and second.
Jeremy: But there was not a first. See, the first did not exist. You could not put a home on the market.
Jesse: That is true. Because everyone was off.
Jeremy: That means in the last 24 hours 36 homes hit the market.
Jesse: Yes.
Jeremy: I did not mean to correct you, but –
Jesse: That is true.
Jeremy: — if you think about this –
Jesse: That is true.
Jeremy: — one day 36 homes hit the market. Holy cow. Okay?
Jesse: And what is coming over the next two months will be probably 1100 homes. I am pretty sure last year it was about 1100 homes between January and February.
Jeremy: Good grief.
Jesse: But before the Parade of Homes, and by March, that number will be 1500.
Jeremy: 1500.
Jesse: Every year.
Jeremy: 1500.
Jesse: And it is just gearing up for our spring season. Especially the Parade of Homes.
Jeremy: I am just looking at some of this data myself. Wow.
Jesse: One thing that is interesting. We have been talking about this is the price reductions. I went and pulled those. There have been 29 reduced prices in the last two days.
Jeremy: Twenty-four hours.
Jesse: Well, this is from the 31st because some of us did work Monday.
Jeremy: Define a price reduction for the listeners.
Jesse: That is somebody that is on the market currently, and they have reduced their price because they realized they were too high.
Jeremy: Yeah. Because look if the market is not supporting what you are buying, what you are selling –
Jesse: What you are selling then you have got –
Jeremy: Yeah, it is very simple. There is Dillard’s had their big annual sale. Oh man, I wanted to go. I am such a shopper. Every January 1st, New Year’s Day, a lot of retailers are closed. They put all of their clearance on 50% of the clearance price, and the place is like a zoo. Right? Well, why? Because the product has not sold –
Jesse: Yep.
Jeremy: — and new product is coming into the store, and the challenge you have as a homeowner is that new product is coming in the store –
Jesse: Right.
Jeremy: — and it is called other people selling their house. Right? So this has happened for how many Januarys in a row?
Jesse: Geesh.
Jeremy: All of them?
Jesse: Yeah, probably since the Parade of Homes started.
Jeremy: Yeah, yeah.
Jesse: Because that is really what drives January and February is the Parade of Homes. So how long ago did that start? 20-25 years ago?
Jeremy: Yeah, and I want to be clear about this. He said it drives it. It drives people’s psychology. It does not actually drive sales in St. George.
Jesse: It does not drive the market, but it drives them wanting to be on the market by then.
Jeremy: Yeah, yeah, this is absolutely true, and it will be interesting to see because we had, for instance, one luxury real estate firm here in town put five homes on the market yesterday. Cancelled the listings in the fall, late fall, and they put them back on yesterday because the belief of every seller, and by the way, if you want to see a video of me talking about that from the chair lift at Bryant Head yesterday.
Jesse: Oh, a new one?
Jeremy: Yeah, you can check it out. A rash of luxury homes hitting the market after January 1. What does this mean? Published 18 hours ago. So I shot a video yesterday at Bryant Head. I was with my kids because the kids all went back to school this morning. Second greatest day of the year, by the way. First greatest day is when they go to school in August.
Jesse: Yes.
Jeremy: And it was interrupted by a phone call, which was fun. The live video. But you might want to check that out. It is right on the Larkin Group Facebook stream. Just look up the Larkin Group and you will find us. But I said what does this mean? Well it means that people believe –
Jesse: That they will sell their home during the Parade.
Jeremy: Yeah.
Jesse: They believe that more high-end, first of all, high-end buyers come for the Parade. And that might be true. But are they really buying homes?
Jeremy: Yeah.
Jesse: But people really believe that not only can they get a buyer at that time of year, they can get a buyer that will pay extraordinary prices.
Jeremy: Yeah. Oh yeah. Right. Let me share something cool with you folks. If you hop on our Facebook stream, we have, so we have been on this show for almost six years.
Jesse: Wow.
Jeremy: Five plus years we have been on the radio.
Jesse: Has it been that long?
Jeremy: It has been a long time, and we have been delivering content via the show, via Facebook, we have a really great video blog, and a lot of our listeners have received those video emails. I am looking at our Facebook stream. This is just the last few days. Excited about buying a home this year? Here is what to watch. These are articles that we have produced.
Jesse: Yep.
Jeremy: Let me share a few more. Selling For Sale By Owner. Questions and comments and concerns. Where is the market headed in 2019? Where is it headed? How to save thousands of dollars in interest on your mortgage. What makes a house a home for you and more and more. We have produced so much content for so long. And by the way, where is the market headed in 2019? A couple of things that we will give you, and then we are going to tell you about something really fun that we are doing. And folks, if you enjoy our program, we are going to ask you for your help today. For the amount of content that we put out compared to the ratio of that to asking for help is pretty low, pretty high to content and low asking for help. Where is the market headed in 2019? This is a really great infographic that we have on our Facebook stream, and again, look up the Larkin Group or Facebook dot com slash The Larkin Group. So what do they predict? They predict that home prices will appreciate across the country 4.8%. Historic home appreciation is 3.6, averaging all the years together.
Jesse: Averaging –
Jeremy: Every year.
Jesse: Okay.
Jeremy: 4.8%. St. George? Jesse says yes. I say no.
Jesse: Yeah, we have a debate there. It is going to interesting next January when we pull, when we come out to really see what happened this year.
Jeremy: Yeah, I say no. I say that we are not going to have any appreciation in Washington County. I think we are going to be exactly static. Interest rates have risen, but they are currently at the lowest point that they have been in six months.
Jesse: Yep, they just went down again.
Jeremy: Yeah, guys, the lowest point in six months. Interest rates right now. Interest rates, amazing, so home prices, Core Logic, which is like the biggest national prediction type firm saying 4.8% appreciation. All four major reporting agencies believe that total home sales will out pace 2018. That is interesting. And interest rates are projected to rise. Are projected to rise. However, let us remind you that in the year 2000, interest rates were 6.2%. In 1990, they were 8.1%. In 1980, they were 12.7%, and in 1970, 8.86. We are so far below everything. Now, I produced a video that has not been released yet, and it is about seven and a half minutes. It is four things you have to know about St. George Real Estate moving into 2019. It is upcoming, forthcoming. It will be on our YouTube channel and on our Facebook page in the next week. So, Jesse, the homes that hit the market this morning. Price ranges?
Jesse: Well, you have got six of them under 250, and that is going to be a problem for your average worker here in St. George.
Jeremy: So only 6, 36 homes hit the market, and only 6 of them –
Jesse: Were under 250.
Jeremy: — were under $250,000.
Jesse: Which is where your average worker can afford a home.
Jeremy: Yeah.
Jesse: You have got six between 250 and 300. That is a pretty good number. That is pretty solid.
Jeremy: Okay.
Jesse: You have got seven between $300,000 and $400,000, six between four and five, and then 11 over 500,000.
Jeremy: Holy smoke. Eleven –
Jesse: Eleven.
Jeremy: — of the 36. So our greatest, over $500,000.
Jesse: Actually, let’s break that down. You have got 3 between 5 and 6, and then 8 over 600.
Jeremy: So I need to say, folks, that is going to be a problem. Just so you know. It is going to be a problem for the average, like you say, the average worker.
Jesse: Yeah, because your average household –
Jeremy: I actually like the word worker. It is like the average, typical, employed human being.
Jesse: Right because your average household income in Washington County is 50,000.
Jeremy: Yep.
Jesse: So somebody making $50,000 a year, how much house can they afford?
Jeremy: 210.
Jesse: Right, so that is –
Jeremy: Maybe 250. If they have a good down payment, 250. So that will be a challenge, and I am here to explain to our luxury homeowners in Washington County, it is going to be tougher than you think it is, and you had better take the job of selling your home very serious. And if you are thinking oh well, this sounds negative, maybe it is not the year. No, remember values are at their highest point in ten years.
Jesse: Yep.
Jeremy: We are at the top. You know the waves out in the ocean if you have been on the ocean. They grow up and they go down. Kind of like when you swim out from the shore 50 yards, and you are floating out there with your friends.
Jesse: Especially –
Jeremy: We are at the top.
Jesse: Yeah, especially up in the higher price points because if you, once you step over $600,000, the amount of inventory just increases astronomically. It goes from 4 to 5 to 18 months.
Jeremy: Yeah, we are at the peak, so you had better take that very serious and work with an agent who is very serious about telling you the, it is funny, there is a script that we use in real estate. We are trained to use it. Hey, Jesse, on a scale of 1 to 10, how honest can I be with you? Well, what do people always say?
Jesse: They say ten until you do it.
Jeremy: There is a reason we are trained to ask this.
Jesse: Yeah.
Jeremy: Because we have to set up the homeowner to actually hear the truth. Hey Jesse, do these pants make me look fat? You are like the fact that you asked me that means that you already knew the answer. Right? The seller, does your price make you look fat and greedy? Kind of. It sounds so terrible, but here is why this is so important. Because if you are thinking well, isn’t it marketing that is going to sell my home? Oh, it is marketing with the right price, and if you are not priced correctly, you will not sell your luxury home in 2019. It is not happening.
Jesse: Yeah.
Jeremy: You will spend the next year of your life, you hear the passion, folks. I emphatically, you will not sell your home if you are not very competitive in that luxury home market. There is so much inventory. We are talking about years, and the market is at its peak.
Jesse: I cannot tell you –
Jeremy: Good grief.
Jesse: — how many homes in the luxury market that we have seen that have been on the market for a year or two off and on.
Jeremy: But we have seen homes that have been on 500 or 1000 days.
Jesse: What is interesting is that even the worst market, luxury homes sold within four months. Very rarely does it take a year to sell a home.
Jeremy: You are right. You are absolutely right. This is just a completely different market than say downtown St. George. All right. We are doing something fun.
Jesse: All right. Let’s do this.
Jeremy: McDonald’s Dollar Value Menu. The Larkin Group Dollar Menu. The Dollar Menu. Okay.
Jesse: We have a Dollar Menu now.
Jeremy: So here is what you have to do. Yeah, we do. And the dollar menu is just like this. We have got a program that we are running for January only. So I was sitting there over the holidays thinking why are we not having more fun? Seriously. We are dealing with people who are stressed out.
Jesse: Yeah, they are.
Jeremy: Think of some of the transactions we are dealing with right now. Folks, a domino succession, chain, they can only, we have a client. Incredible people who, think about this, the spouse is going to pass away in the very near future because of some serious health elements. The other spouse cannot physically afford to live, will be homeless or bankrupt if they do not sell the home now because the retirement and Social Security will go away when the husband passes away.
Jesse: Yep.
Jeremy: They have to sell the home. They cannot live somewhere if they do not sell the home first, but if they do not sell the home, she is going to be homeless. And by the way, prices are high in St. George, so now they are trying to figure out what she can possibly afford at her new income. Do you see this? And, of course, then you are depending on the buyer if their home, it is crazy. Right?
Jesse: Yeah, it is kind of emotional.
Jeremy: So then you have another seller on the other end who is hoping these people close on their sale so they can make the purchase of their home. It is very complicated. So I said why aren’t we having more fun? So we are going to have more fun. You can sell your home for as little as one buck. Now you do not need to sell it in January. You just need to enroll in the program in January. $1. I do not have time to get into all the details, but I will give you the one detail. The absolute specific criteria is you have to buy another home through us. And by the way, do you know that when you buy a home, you do not pay a commission? Because remember the seller pays the commission.
Jesse: Yep.
Jeremy: There are other terms and conditions. You have to be born in 1957. You have to have an odd number ending your Social Security number, and you have to have sandy blonde hair. I am kidding. You know those crazy, it is actually not that crazy. The terms and conditions are not crazy at all. But you do need to buy another home through us because we are literally going to charge on the listing side a dollar if you buy another home through us. Meaning no income for us on the listing side. Okay? Here is an alternate. If you are not buying home through us, we said okay, then what can we do? Because we want everybody to win.
Jesse: Right.
Jeremy: If you are not buying another home through us because meaning you are going to rent a home or you are moving out of town, you still can save up to $10,000 selling your home. And you will save no less than $1250. Right?
Jesse: Yep, $1250.
Jeremy: One thousand two hundred and fifty dollars at the lowest price point. It is based on price point. Most of our clients are going to save $2,500 selling a home. That is the most typical segment will be at $2,500.
Jesse: Right.
Jeremy: There is no gimmick. There is no qualification. If you sign a listing agreement with the Larkin Group in January, you will be getting that discount or you can be in the dollar program. And by the way, both apply. So the dollar programs applies if you are trying to buy another home. You can work through both. Now, here is the deal. We made a goal. We sat down as a team several days and said what do we want to do? And last year we helped about 180 clients buy and sell real estate. We decided we were going to procure 90 families in 90 days, in the first 90 days of 2019. We decided that for our families, now again, folks, earlier I said we have given you this content for years and years and years, and we are asking for your help. We are asking today for you to be mindful of the Larkin Group as, 90 in 90 is almost unheard of. Okay?
Jesse: Very few people –
Jeremy: Very few people have pulled this off. We want to find 90 great clients like yourself that need our services. It is a win-win situation. We are doing the dollar home sale program or the save up to $10,000. If you or someone you know has thought about selling, we are asking will you send them to us?
Jesse: Have them give us a call.
Jeremy: Will you let us talk to them? You do not have to commit them to anything. There is no obligation to talk to us, but you can reach us on Facebook dot com slash St. George Experts or at Sold in St. George dot com. It is going to be fun to report what happens when we get to the end of these 90 days to see what we do. We are going to have a good time this year.
Jesse: It is going to be fun.
Jeremy: It is going to be a great year in St. George real estate. Hope you guys can help us, and we will guarantee we will help you. Thank you.